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Upcoming Courses - Winter Intersession 2018

Any schedule posted on this page is tentative and therefore subject to change without notice due to any number of factors, including cancellation due to low enrollment. Course Descriptions are provided for reference only and are also subject to change.

If you have any questions about the courses to be offered next semester, please contact the scheduling advisor for English:

Dee Dee Lopez
delopez@unm.edu
(505) 277-6347
Humanities 213

 

200-Level
200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

219.028: Technical and Professional Writing

Online Dec. 14 - Jan. 13
Rachael Reynolds, reynoldsr@unm.edu

English 219 provides practice in the analysis of writing situations and audiences, and in the writing and editing of workplace documents, including correspondence, instructional documents, reports and proposals. In this fast-paced online section, students will analyze questions of audience, culture, and communicative purpose, and will complete three professional documents (written and multimodal) and a portfolio.

219.033: Technical and Professional Writing

Online Dec. 14 - Jan. 13
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu 

English 219 focuses on how to write and design documents commonly found in the professional workplace. We'll learn about creating documents such as professional letters, memos, procedures, manuals, proposals, and analytical reports. Our focus will be on the appropriate structure, writing style, and page layout to use in producing documents that are aimed at meeting readers’ needs. 

220.025: Expository Writing

Online Dec. 14 - Jan. 13
Julie Shigekuni, jshig@unm.edu 

Life confronts us with a series of mysteries: The simplest daily goals—such as, what do I want and how do I go about getting what I want?—are fraught with complications, sometimes related to our objectives, sometimes not; yet what we are looking for alters the path we choose to take. The subject of this course is your world. What does it look like? What are the layers of your reality?  This month-long online course we will focus on inquiry and methods of investigation—from the rhetorical to the creative. You will spend the first two weeks reading independently and responding to discussion prompts; during the second two weeks you will actively engage in the virtual classroom as an investigator and a reporter, utilizing research to present your vision to the group in the form of evidence. The primary text, Natsuo Kirino's Real World, is available at the UNM Bookstore and on Amazon. Plan ahead by getting Kirino's novel asap.

300-Level
200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

315.002: T: The Harlem Renaissance

Online Dec. 14 - Jan. 13
Finnie Coleman, coleman@unm.edu

This course is an introduction to the art, literature, and music of the Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance was one of the most fecund periods in all American literature and a watershed moment in the development of African American cultural history. Before delving into the literature, music, and art of the Harlem Renaissance we will review African American cultural history with an eye toward better understanding Black identity development and what it meant to be a Black American on the eve of the Harlem Renaissance. With the proper context established, we will read the works of the major writers from the period, discuss the visual arts, and familiarize ourselves with the genesis of Jazz and Blues music. We will close the course with a look at how the Harlem Renaissance set the stage for the Black Arts Movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s and the coterminous rise of Hip Hop Culture.

388.003: Survey of Later English Literature: Dickens and Christmas

Online
Gail Houston, ghouston@unm.edu

Dickens is often called the man who invented Christmas as we know it today. In this course, we will intensively analyze A Christmas Carol by attending to key biographical indicators as well as historical issues that influence the writing of this famous tale. We also look at earlier "Christmas" writings by Dickens that lead up to the great "Carol," as well as Dickens's  early versions of the story. We will also do close stylistic readings of the text. In addition, we use film analysis to enrich our viewing of two famous film versions of the tale. 

400-Level
200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

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Department of English Language and Literature
Humanities Building, Second Floor
MSC03 2170
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Phone: (505) 277-6347
Fax: (505) 277-0021

english@unm.edu