Upcoming - Summer 2021

Any schedule posted on this page is tentative and therefore subject to change without notice due to any number of factors, including cancellation due to low enrollment. Course Descriptions are provided for reference only and are also subject to change.

If you have any questions about the courses to be offered next semester, please contact the scheduling advisor for English:

Dee Dee Lopez
delopez@unm.edu
(505) 277-6347
Humanities 213

100-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

 

1110X.001: Composition I (Stretch I)

Remote Scheduled, MWR 0900-1100
Dania Ammar, dammar@unm.edu

First semester of Composition I stretch sequence. Focuses on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW)

This is the first course in a two-part sequence. In order to receive transfer credit for ENGL 1110, all courses in this sequence (ENGL 1110X, ENGL 1110Y) must be taken and passed.

Credit for both ENGL 1110X and ENGL 1110 may not be applied toward a degree program.

Students with ACT English  =<15 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing  =<449 or ACCUPLACER Sentence Skills =<278 or Lobo Course Placement English Placement Tool = 10 will begin their English Composition Sequence with ENGL 1110X. 

1110.001 & 2: Composition I

Online
Mikaela Osler, mosler@unm.edu

Covers Composition I: Stretch I and II in one semester, focusing on analyzing rhetorical situations and responding with appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW)

Credit for both this course and ENGL 1110X may not be applied toward a degree program.

Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

Prerequisite: ACT English =16-25 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =450-659 or Next Generation ACCUPLACER Writing =>279 or Lobo Course Placement English Placement Tool = 20 or WritePlacer = 6-8.

1120.001 & 3: Composition II

Online
Emily Reiff, ereiff01@unm.edu

Focuses on academic writing, research, and argumentation using appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW)

Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690 or Lobo Course Placement English Placement Tool = 30.

1120.002: Composition II

Online
Jennifer Tubbs, jtubbs@unm.edu

Focuses on academic writing, research, and argumentation using appropriate genres and technologies. (EPW)

Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

Prerequisite: 1110 or 1110Y or 1110Z or ACT English =26-28 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =660-690 or Lobo Course Placement English Placement Tool = 30.

 

200-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

 

2210.001 & 3: Professional & Technical Communication

Online
Lukus Malaney, lrattanapotemalaney@unm.edu

Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. (EPW)

Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

Course description video

2210.002: Professional & Technical Communication

Online
Robert Esquibel, resquibel92@unm.edu

Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. (EPW)

Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

Course description video

2210.004 & 005: Professional & Technical Communication

Online
Jessie Bonafede, jkbonafede@unm.edu

Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. (EPW)

Meets New Mexico Lower-Division General Education Common Core Curriculum Area I: Communications.

Prerequisite: 1120 or ACT English =>29 or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing =>700.

Course description video

2310.001: Introduction to Creative Writing

Online, 2H: 7/5/21-7/31/21
Julie Shigekuni, jshig@unm.edu

This month-long intensive course in creative writing will be divided into the study of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. You will spend one week in each genre reading work published in Janet Burroway’s anthology and doing writing prompts designed to increase your understanding of each genre. The final week will be spent developing a piece of writing in the genre of your choosing. In terms of assignments, you will begin by writing about life as you know it based on experience. You will then re-imagine your remembered past into fiction, and then go on to play with what Janet Burroway calls “Concrete Significant Details” in a series of poems. The aim is to provide the beginning writer with a range of methods by which to posit questions and search for answers creatively. Every reading discussion and writing experiment has been designed to emphasize the elements of craft involved in creative writing. Online classwork will consist of work done individually, small and large group discussions, and structured workshops.

2620.001: American Literature II

Online, 1H: 6/7/21-7/3/21
M. R. Hofer, mrh@unm.edu

This course surveys the evolution of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century through the twentieth, with special emphasis on cultural and social issues frequently associated with modernism and modernity. For each of our four modules we will discuss at least one major fictional work, a generous selection of influential poems, and also a culturally significant film.

Our study begins with a week on the Civil War that extends to the beginning of World War I. From there, we will shift our focus to the growth of the modern metropolis from the “roaring” 1920s through the 1940s. In week three, we will investigate racial identity in the American “melting pot” with reference to the Harlem Renaissance as well as the Black Arts Movement. Our fourth and final week will be dedicated to the Cold War era and an indigenous, if not insular, sense of what it meant to be an American when the country was one of two viable global superpowers.

The survey introduces many canonical authors whose reputations—if not individual works—you may already know. However, it aims to do so in conjunction with other important American writers who are perhaps, and perhaps unjustly, lesser known. Our survey will center on prose by Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, and J. D. Salinger, poetry by Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Robert Frost, Marianne Moore, William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Claude McKay, Robert Hayden, Gwendolyn Brooks, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, W. S. Merwin, Charles Olson, and Robert Creeley, and films by Charlie Chaplin, Orson Welles, Marian C. Cooper, and Stanley Kubrick.

There are no prerequisites for this course, and no formal knowledge of literary criticism, history, or theory is required in order to be successful in it.

300-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

 

374.001: Southwest Literature and Culture

Online, 2H: 7/5/21-7/31/21
Melina Vizcaíno-Alemán, mviz@unm.edu

New Mexico and the greater Southwest has long been a contested region. In this course, we will explore how literature, film, and art provide complex portrayals of the beauty, borders, and violence of the Southwest and its unique history. From Spanish colonial narratives to late 19th-century print culture, the class will explore the literary and cultural traditions that form the region. The course content will focus especially on the 20th century, from the art and literature that came out of the expatriate modernist communities in Santa Fe and Taos, to western genre films and their iterations in Native and Mexican American literature, art, and film from the early to the late 20th century. We will explore both the written and visual cultures of the place and its people, and pay special attention to the formation of race, class, ethnicity, and gender.

388.001: Literature and Film

Online, 1H: 6/7/21-7/3/21
Gail Houston, ghouston@unm.edu

”Let us concur that this kind of fiction, whatever one may think of it, is assuredly not without merit: twas the inevitable result of the revolutionary shocks which all of Europe has suffered. For anyone familiar with the full range of misfortunes wherewith evildoers can beset mankind, the novel became as difficult to write as monotonous to read. There was not a man alive who had not experienced in the short span of four or five years more misfortunes than the most celebrated novelist could portray in a century. Thus, to compose works of interest, one had to call upon the aid of hell itself, and to find in the world of make- believe things wherewith one was fully familiar merely by delving into man's daily life in this age of iron.  (Marquis de Sade on Gothic fiction, Idee sur les Romans (Geneva: Slatkine, 1967; http://graduate.engl.virginia.edu/enec981/Group/chris.social.html#sade)

Course Description

As the above excerpt from the Marquis de Sade (from whose name the word “sadism” comes) suggests, the nineteenth-century British Gothic novel must be read in light of historical events and anxieties. Nineteenteeth-century Britain experienced the Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution, the Kantian Revolution, the Woman Question, the Condition of England question, the Crisis of Faith, new understandings about the psyche and science, and debates about slavery and empire. Knowing the history of nineteenth-century British anxieties is crucial to understanding the Gothic. We will read three Gothic novels, Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula to help us understand this disturbing, spectacular phenonmenon, while also learning how to analyze fiction and film elements on a basic level. Thus we will:

    • Learn and use basic elements of fiction
    • Learn and use basic elements of film
    • Learn and use background on nineteenth-century British Gothic fiction and film
  • Use knowledge of the above to summarize, synthesize, and analyze the fiction and film we are studying

 

Department of English Language and Literature
Humanities Building, Second Floor
MSC03 2170
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Phone: (505) 277-6347
Fax: (505) 277-0021

english@unm.edu