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Fall 2014 Course Descriptions

100-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

150.001: The Study of Literature

TR 1100-1215
Sinae Kang, sinaekg@unm.edu

This course is designed as an introduction to the study, appreciation, and most importantly, enjoyment of literary works of poetry, drama, and fiction for non-English majors. In this class, we will aim for several ambitious but equally important goals. First, we will discuss why literature, not only the contemporary ones but also those that were created centuries ago still matters to us living in the twenty first century. Great literary works can still be meaningful even when taken out of their original context of creation. Therefore, secondly, we will see how literary texts initiate, provoke, and engage in creative as well as critical dialogues with the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of their creation and consumption. In this perspective, we will apply interdisciplinary approach and look into some of the art and film works inspired by or closely related to the primary texts. Finally, we will also learn how understanding writers' techniques, literary conventions, and critical currents and perspectives can actually increase your enjoyment of literary works. That is, in contrast to some people's belief (and fear) that critical analysis spoils our reading experience, we will see coming up with not only intuitive but also"reasoned" (critical and analytic) responses can be fun.

150.002: The Study of Literature

MWF 1300 -1350 
Natalie Kubasek, nkubasek@unm.edu

This course introduces non-English majors to the study of literature. In this course, we will read from a variety of genres including short stories, poetry, drama, and the novel, and we will explore oral and visual literary forms. Students will develop a deeper appreciation for literature and improve their abilities to discuss and analyze a literary text through a consideration of genre conventions, style, themes, historical context and representations of identity. In addition, students will learn to compose in both textual and multimodal modes of literary scholarship. Required work in this course includes quizzes, three short response papers, two exams, and two literary analysis projects.

150.620: Why Burn Harry Potter? Children's Books & Censorship

MWF 1000-1050: Learning Community
Sheri Karmiol, metzger@unm.edu

This is an FLC class. Students must also register for English 120. If you need to take English 120, this is an opportunity to write essays about the kinds of books that you love to read. Write essays about JK Rowling's Harry Potter, Judy Blume's Blubber, or Sherman Alexie's Diary Of a Part-Time Indian. In this Freshman Seminar we will examine the ways in which literature for children and young adults is governed by the social, religious, and political influences that a particular community may embrace. Should children's books focus on topics such as child abuse? Should fairy tales be censored? While we may not be able to resolve these issues, we will emerge from this class with a better understanding of the interaction between community values, censorship, and children's books. Assignments: 4 short exams, several short papers, and a final book project.

150.634: "Love, Lust, and Passion"

MWF 1000-1050 The linked course, CJ 130, meets MWF at 9:00-9:50.
Deborah Fillerup Weagel, dweagel@unm.edu

In this course, we seek to understand the differences between love, lust, and passion as presented in literature and film. We will read a novel, a play, short stories, poems, and nonfiction texts. We also view films that depict a variety of human relationships. In our discussions, we analyze the relationships in connection to our own lives. How can we learn from both the good examples and mistakes of others, real or fictional? Students keep journals, write three 2-page response papers, a love poem, a 3-page memoir, and a final 6-8 page research paper. They also give an oral presentation that is based on the research project and take four quizzes. We attend an artistic performance related to our discussions and hold an Academy Awards day. 

150.635: "Myth & the American Mind"

TR 1530-1645 The linked course, English 120, meets on TR at 1700-1825. 
Matthew Hofer, mrh@unm.edu

Travel fascinates people. So does change. In this FLC seminar we will investigate the desire to travel and the travail of exile as well as desired and forced metamorphoses. Our conversations about heroes and antiheroes, creation and destruction, and the mythic quest will foreground the contemporary practices of literary, visual, and cultural analysis. We will analyze influential poems, fiction, and film in an attempt to assess the tense yet productive relationship of myth to reason, in both the ancient world and our own. This ongoing consideration will underwrite our effort to comprehend both how and why “myth” continues to inform the cultures of the future.

200-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

219.003: Technical & Professional Writing

MWF 1000-1050 
Monica Kowal, kowal1@unm.edu

Technical & Professional Writing will introduce you to the different types of documents found in the workplace. In this class we will focus on how to analyze and understand readers' needs as well as develop a coherent structure, clear style, and compelling page layout. You will also learn useful writing and research strategies that you can use as you write professional correspondence, procedures, resumes, presentations, proposals, and multi-page reports. This section of Technical & Professional Writing also features a service-learning component that involves working directly with an agency or organization. Our service-learning work in this technical writing course will involve developing technical documents for a campus organization, a local non-profit organization, or government agency. This will allow you to work with a real-world audience and will ensure that the significant time you put into your class project leads to meaningful results. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of documents you will encounter in the workplace and to help you establish successful strategies for creating them. While individual writing tasks represent the significant bulk of class activities and instruction, you will also participate in collaborative work.

219.004: Technical & Professional Writing

MWF 1100-1150 
Monica Kowal, kowal1@unm.edu

Technical & Professional Writing will introduce you to the different types of documents found in the workplace. In this class we will focus on how to analyze and understand readers' needs as well as develop a coherent structure, clear style, and compelling page layout. You will also learn useful writing and research strategies that you can use as you write professional correspondence, procedures, resumes, presentations, proposals, and multi-page reports. This section of Technical & Professional Writing also features a service-learning component that involves working directly with an agency or organization. Our service-learning work in this technical writing course will involve developing technical documents for a campus organization, a local non-profit organization, or government agency. This will allow you to work with a real-world audience and will ensure that the significant time you put into your class project leads to meaningful results. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of documents you will encounter in the workplace and to help you establish successful strategies for creating them. While individual writing tasks represent the significant bulk of class activities and instruction, you will also participate in collaborative work.

219.005: Technical Communication for Engineers

MWF 1200-1250 
Dianne Bechtel, di4srv@unm.edu

ENGINEERING MAJORS ONLY This course is restricted to engineering majors only. Engineering majors often require a special skill-set and create, write, and publish documents that are highly technical in nature and discipline specific. The objective of English 219 SoE is to instruct engineering students on the types of writing and communication that is necessary for success in varied engineering domains by addressing technical and professional writing from an engineering perspective. Broadly, the course will address concerns of professional, technical, and ethical communication, practical workplace communication skills, research and investigation of contemporary engineering issues, and application of engineering instruction in professional communication contexts.

219.007: Technical & Professional Writing

MWF 1300-1350 
Monica Kowal, kowal1@unm.edu

Technical & Professional Writing will introduce you to the different types of documents found in the workplace. In this class we will focus on how to analyze and understand readers' needs as well as develop a coherent structure, clear style, and compelling page layout. You will also learn useful writing and research strategies that you can use as you write professional correspondence, procedures, resumes, presentations, proposals, and multi-page reports. This section of Technical & Professional Writing also features a service-learning component that involves working directly with an agency or organization. Our service-learning work in this technical writing course will involve developing technical documents for a campus organization, a local non-profit organization, or government agency. This will allow you to work with a real-world audience and will ensure that the significant time you put into your class project leads to meaningful results. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with a variety of documents you will encounter in the workplace and to help you establish successful strategies for creating them. While individual writing tasks represent the significant bulk of class activities and instruction, you will also participate in collaborative work.

219.017: Technical Communication for Engineers

TR 1230-1345 
Natasha Jones, nnjones@unm.edu

ENGINEERING MAJORS ONLY This course is restricted to engineering majors only. Engineering majors often require a special skill-set and create, write, and publish documents that are highly technical in nature and discipline specific. The objective of English 219 SoE is to instruct engineering students on the types of writing and communication that is necessary for success in varied engineering domains by addressing technical and professional writing from an engineering perspective. Broadly, the course will address concerns of professional, technical, and ethical communication, practical workplace communication skills, research and investigation of contemporary engineering issues, and application of engineering instruction in professional communication contexts.

219.021: Technical and Professional Writing

Online 
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

In English 219, students learn how to write and design documents commonly found in the professional workplace. The course covers principles related to structure, style, research methodology, audience analysis, and document design. Assignments include creating professional letters, memos, procedures, manuals, proposals, and analytical reports.

220.001: The Ghostly, the Hunted, and the Supernaturally in English Literature

MWF 0900-0950 
Ying Xu, yingxu@unm.edu

English 220 is an intermediate composition course for students who wish to increase their skills in gathering, reporting, and interpreting information, and making cogent arguments based on solid evidence. In this section of 220, we will use “texts” on the haunted, the gothic and the supernatural– primarily short stories, but also novels and film – as a means to learn how to analyze the audience, purpose, and social and cultural contexts of certain “texts,” and write effectively about them. Many writers have borrowed the tropes of ghosts, the supernatural, forebodings, dreams of premonition, metamorphoses to represent unspeakable fear, horror, and anxieties. The course will study a wide range of ghost and supernatural stories in English literature that include Mary Shelley, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry James, Jean Rhys, Toni Morrison, and Leslie Silko. Through examining the ghostly presence and the supernatural elements in these texts, the course aims to help student understand how the fantastic elements function in relation to the specific social contexts that produced these texts. The course will focus on analyzing the repressed and the haunted in terms of identity formation. Students will be challenged to reexamine issues such as race and gender and come up with their own definitions of the fantastic and the gothic. The course reflects a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic approach to literature through the incorporation of texts reflecting a variety of beliefs, customs, cultures, and backgrounds. Be prepared to do a lot of reading, active participation in class, and writing, including weekly online discussions and four longer writing assignments. Also be ready to work on an independent project, including reading an additional novel outside of class time.

220.002: Expository Writing

MW 1100-1215: UNM West
Staff

220.003: The Ghostly, the Hunted, and the Supernaturally in English Literature

MWF 1100-1150 
Ying Xu, yingxu@unm.edu

English 220 is an intermediate composition course for students who wish to increase their skills in gathering, reporting, and interpreting information, and making cogent arguments based on solid evidence. In this section of 220, we will use “texts” on the haunted, the gothic and the supernatural– primarily short stories, but also novels and film – as a means to learn how to analyze the audience, purpose, and social and cultural contexts of certain “texts,” and write effectively about them. Many writers have borrowed the tropes of ghosts, the supernatural, forebodings, dreams of premonition, metamorphoses to represent unspeakable fear, horror, and anxieties. The course will study a wide range of ghost and supernatural stories in English literature that include Mary Shelley, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry James, Jean Rhys, Toni Morrison, and Leslie Silko. Through examining the ghostly presence and the supernatural elements in these texts, the course aims to help student understand how the fantastic elements function in relation to the specific social contexts that produced these texts. The course will focus on analyzing the repressed and the haunted in terms of identity formation. Students will be challenged to reexamine issues such as race and gender and come up with their own definitions of the fantastic and the gothic. The course reflects a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic approach to literature through the incorporation of texts reflecting a variety of beliefs, customs, cultures, and backgrounds. Be prepared to do a lot of reading, active participation in class, and writing, including weekly online discussions and four longer writing assignments. Also be ready to work on an independent project, including reading an additional novel outside of class time.

220.004: "Write, Sing, Dance! Literature and Musicals"

TR 0800-0915 
Deborah Fillerup Weagel, dweagel@unm.edu

In this course we study literary works that inspired various musicals. We analyze the process of adaptation, the incorporation of visual and aural components (such as dance and music) with a literary text, and elements of general creativity. We read fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm, George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion, Gaston Leroux's novel The Phantom of the Opera, academic essays, and other texts. We also view and analyze corresponding musicals that are based on the literary works. In addition, we read and complete exercises in Twyla Tharp's book The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life, in order to stimulate our own creativity in academic and creative endeavors. Students keep journals, write five short response papers, a 5-page literary and/or film analysis, a 5-page memoir/report, a 3-page reflective essay, and an 8-10 page research paper. They give an oral presentation at the end of the semester that is based on their research paper and take four short quizzes. 

220.005: Writing the Transgressive Female Experience

MWF 1300-1350 
Dene Shelton, sheltond@unm.edu

First wave, second wave, third wave, who cares? Is the feminist revolution over? Do women now share equal rights with men? This course utilizes the personal narrative to explore societal limitations placed on women in the modern day United States. Students will be asked to share a personal narrative, to center that narrative within the course texts, and to triangulate by presenting "œthe personal is political" relationship to the class via multi-media format. The integration of creative work with informed research is highly encouraged, as students are introduced briefly to autoethnographic and ficto-critical analyses. As preparation for the three major assignments, students will read a small but comprehensive sampling of selected memoir and rarely, outsider fiction works, chosen specifically from the following 10 female writers: Michelle Tea (Valencia, Without a Net:The Female Experience of Growing Up Working Class: a collection, Rent Girl: a graphic memoir), Marjane Satrapi (Persepolis: a graphic memoir), Alison Bechdel (Fun Home: a graphic memoir), Diane DiMassa (Hothead Paisan, Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist: Comic), Dorothy Allison (Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, The Women Who Hate Me, Two or Three Things I Know for Sure, Skin: Talking About Sex, Class and Literature), Abigail Thomas (Safekeeping, A Three Dog Life), Kathryn Harrison (The Kiss, The Mother Knot, Seeking Rapture), Julia Alvarez (Something to Declare, The Woman I Kept to Myself, Once Upon a Quinceanera, Beauty's Nothing, The Other Side), Jamaica Kincaid (A Small Place, The Autobiography of my Mother), Mary Karr (Th e Liar's Club, Cherry: A Memoir, Lit: A Memoir). (Don't be scared: we will not be reading all of this material. Reading material subject to change as the course progresses.)

220.006: The Legal Imagination

MWF 1400-1450 
Christopher Ryan, cpryan@unm.edu

The Legal Imagination is an advanced course in reading and writing.  It is a study of what lawyers and judges do with words.  The focus of the course is law, but it will be useful to any student interested in how language is manipulated and controlled by writers and how language practices come to shape a profession and the professionals operating within that profession. The title of this class derives from the book The Legal Imagination published in 1973 by James Boyd White.  This text is widely considered to be Professor White's seminal work and one of the founding documents of the law and literature movement.  Readings are derived mostly from literature and the classics and include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Twain, Frost, Hume, Thoreau, Proust, Dickens, E.M. Forster, Chaucer, and others.  We will also examine prominent and well known court cases, legal statutes, and other legal literature including writings from Justices Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Benjamin Cardozo.  The writing assignments in the course will primarily ask you to reflect on your own use of language.  The final ten page paper will ask you to apply the principles learned in class to your own area of academic interest.  No background in law or legal studies is required, but an interest in the field will be useful.

220.007: Western Film and Literature

MWF 1500-1550
Matthew Maruyama, reidmaruyama@gmail.com

This class will focus on five primary texts: "Blood Meridian" by Cormac McCarthy, "Butcher's Crossing" by John Williams, "Warlock" by Oakley Hall, "Angels" by Denis Johnson, and "Son of a Gun" by Justin St. Germain. Discussion will be centered on how these five novels use the genre of the Western in order to debunk and expose the myths of the Wild West and how the violence that accompanied Westward Expansion in the 1800s has affected our contemporary politics and the way in which we've shaped an American identity. We will also watch some of the early films of John Wayne and Gary Cooper and will follow the progression of the genre through to the Spaghetti Westerns and to Clint Eastwood's masterpiece, "Unforgiven." Through this progression, we will discuss how the Western genre has pushed into the intellectual realm, where psychological depth and complexity has replaced the simplicity of heroism.

220.008: Gothic Horror: The Rhetoric of Gender Construction in Frankenstein, The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Dracula

TR 1700-1815
Katherine Alexander, kalex@unm.edu

This English 220 course will explore several works in the genre of "Gothic Horror" under the lens of rhetoric.  The purpose is to look at the rhetoric of gender constructions in several formats.  Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's iconic work of 1818 begins the exploration.  The first edition of Frankenstein was heavily edited by Percy Bysshe Shelley.  Finally, in 1831, Mary Shelley's version was published. In this unit, students will compare the masculinist version edited by Percy to Mary's version as they compare the rhetoric of the husband and wife. To enhance the experience, students will view excerpts from the 1931 film starring Bor is Karloff.  These will be followed by Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein.  Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, a novella depicting the absolute binaries of good and evil is the subject of the second unit.  Film excerpts include the 1931 film starring Frederic March and the 1941 version starring Spencer Tracey.  These films provide intense visuals for a better understanding of the material.   The third unit involves the study of Bram Stoker's Dracula of 1897.  This novel is important because it features the "new woman" who can work for a living as a typist. Stoker's rhetoric attempts to find words for the anxieties facing late era Victorians.  Film presentations include the Bela Lugosi production of 1931 as well as Mel Brooks's Dead and Loving It starring Leslie Nielsen.   Supplementing the novels and films will be readings from M. Jimmie Killingsworth's Appeals in Modern Rhetoric and lectures that I have prepared on movements in rhetoric from antiquity to modern times.  This course offers a multimodal approach rather than the traditional lecture approach.  Therefore, assignments and activities for students will include varied formats and genres. Come join us if you want to expand your knowledge in an exciting atmosphere!  

220.010: Expository Writing

MWF 1000-1050
Kelly J Hunnings, kellyhunnings@unm.edu

220.021: Expository Writing

Online
Christopher Adam, cadam@ucla.edu

Space Travel: Technology, Entrepreneurship, and Storytelling. The theme this section covers is sci-fi, with particular attention given to the technological, entrepreneurial, and mythical aspects of it. The world of sci-fi inquires about real technological possibilities. It has motivated scientific development and has created markets by instilling in consumers the desire for products that they had never previously envisioned using. In this course, we will try to understand this interplay among storytelling, entrepreneurship, and technology by analyzing popular film and TV literature (including but not limited to Star Trek), along with journalism covering the entrepreneurial aspects of sci-fi and academic work about the scientific side. Written assignments will bring these diverse sources together in such projects as evaluations, analytical reports, and proposals.

220.022: Expository Writing

Online 
Ying Xu, yingxu@unm.edu

English 220 is an intermediate composition course for students who wish to increase their skills in gathering, reporting, and interpreting information, and making cogent arguments based on solid evidence. In this section of 220, we will use “texts” on the haunted, the gothic and the supernatural– primarily short stories, but also novels and film – as a means to learn how to analyze the audience, purpose, and social and cultural contexts of certain “texts,” and write effectively about them. Many writers have borrowed the tropes of ghosts, the supernatural, forebodings, dreams of premonition, metamorphoses to represent unspeakable fear, horror, and anxieties. The course will study a wide range of ghost and supernatural stories in English literature that include Mary Shelley, Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry James, Jean Rhys, Toni Morrison, and Leslie Silko. Through examining the ghostly presence and the supernatural elements in these texts, the course aims to help student understand how the fantastic elements function in relation to the specific social contexts that produced these texts. The course will focus on analyzing the repressed and the haunted in terms of identity formation. Students will be challenged to reexamine issues such as race and gender and come up with their own definitions of the fantastic and the gothic. The course reflects a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic approach to literature through the incorporation of texts reflecting a variety of beliefs, customs, cultures, and backgrounds. Be prepared to do a lot of reading, active participation in class, and writing, including weekly online discussions and four longer writing assignments. Also be ready to work on an independent project, including reading an additional novel outside of class time.

220.031: The Grotesque in Literature and Film

TR 0800-0915
Megan Malcom-Morgan, megan90@unm.edu

The grotesque is essentially the sphere of the unfathomable, a familiar world in the process of dissolution or estrangement. The grotesque world is--and is not--our own world. The grotesque introduces social contradictions such as rational men becoming irrational and a human who is also a "thing." The grotesque is a mixture of both the comedic and the terrifying and disrupts the idea of "normative." This course will introduce students to the genre of the grotesque both in literature and film, beginning with nineteenth century European and American literary concepts to the more contemporary interpretations in film, example: Tim Burton movies.Readings will include: Sigmund Freud, "The Uncanny;" Mary Shelley Frankenstein; Robert Louis Stevenson The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Lewis Carroll; Alice's Adventures in Wonderland; Franz Kafka The Metamorphosis; Gaston Leroux The Phantom of the Opera; William Faulkner As I Lay Dying; Short stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Flannery O'Connor and various other authors.

220.032: Writing on Visual Narratives: Beyond Words with Pictures

TR 0930-1045
Ann D'Orazio, dorazio@unm.edu

This course will explore and analyze a variety of visual narratives while teaching a critical vocabulary that bridges the perceived divide between verbal and visual expression. In our investigations, we will attempt to understand how a visual narrative differs from a piece of literature or art as commonly understood. We will begin with an historical and theoretical overview of visual narratives, which will include materials ranging from the Bayeux Tapestry to Goya and Hogarth and texts by writers such as Stuart Hall, Scott McCloud, and W.J.T. Mitchell. We will then move into thematically-arranged sequences of comics, examining nonfiction comics, genre comics, and auteur comics along the way.

220.033: The Cultural Hero

MWF 1300-1350 
Mark Caughey, mcaughey@unm.edu

This course will explore not only how cultures construct their heroes but also how heroes construct a sense of cultural identity. We will consider both the hero's ancient origins and its transformation over time and across cultures -- from the epic hero to its latter-day counterpart: the superhero. To that end, we will examine such texts as /The Epic of Gilgamesh/, /The Saga of the Volsungs/ and Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy. Along the way, we will develop a framework that will help us understand how some characteristics of the hero remain constant while others arise from specific cultural beliefs and values. Students will hone their writing and research skills through assignments that include reviews, comparative analyses a nd annotated bibliographies.

220.035: "Write, Sing, Dance! Literature and Musicals"

MWF 0800-0850 
Deborah Fillerup Weagel, dweagel@unm.edu

In this course we study literary works that inspired various musicals. We analyze the process of adaptation, the incorporation of visual and aural components (such as dance and music) with a literary text, and elements of general creativity. We read fairy tales from the Brothers Grimm, George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion, Gaston Leroux's novel The Phantom of the Opera, academic essays, and other texts. We also view and analyze corresponding musicals that are based on the literary works. In addition, we read and complete exercises in Twyla Tharp's book The Creative Habit: Learn It and Use It for Life, in order to stimulate our own creativity in academic and creative endeavors. Students keep journals, write five short response papers, a 5-page literary and/or film analysis, a 5-page memoir/report, a 3-page reflective essay, and an 8-10 page research paper. They give an oral presentation at the end of the semester that is based on their research paper and take four short quizzes. 

220.036: Fairy Tales and Folklore

TR 0930-1045
Karra Shimabukuro, kshimabukuro@unm.edu

Fairy tales, and fairy tale revisions have become very popular again- shows such as Once Upon a Time and Grimm, as well as movies such as Maleficent, Snow White and the Huntsman, Mirror, Mirror and Frozen. This course will focus on the original literary versions of fairy tales and 19th, 20th, and 21st century revisions. We will re-read the classics Beauty and the Beast, Bluebeard, Little Red Riding hood, Puss-in-Boots, and Sleeping Beauty from a contemporary author's perspective, starting with Apuleius, Straparola, Basile, Perrault, and the Grimm Brothers. We will then compare their versions to 20th-century re-tellings by British author Angela Carter.

224.001: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1000-1050 
Michelle Brooks, mbrooks7@juno.com

This course will be a general introduction to creative writing. We will study the writing of different genres. In addition to writing short stories, poems, and essays, students can expect to read examples of these genres.

224.002: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 1400-1515
Mark Caughey, mcaughey@unm.edu

This course will introduce students to the craft of writing in the genres of fiction, poetry and creative nonfiction. In the first half of the course, assignments will stress generative strategies; in the latter half, we will focus on structuring, revising and refining our work. Likewise, while the first few weeks will address issues of craft common to all genres, we will ultimately be focusing on those concerns and conventions that define and distinguish each genre. Although each student will be writing in all three genres, no one will be expected to master any of them. After all, the goal is exploration, not conquest. Because one cannot be a thoughtful writer without first being a thoughtful reader, we will be engaged in quite a bit of reading -- using stories, poems and essays by established authors as models for our own.

224.003: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 1100-1215
Kathryne Joo Yung Lim, klim@unm.edu

224.004: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 1700-1815
Lynn Lloydean Wohlwend, lwohlwend@unm.edu

224.005: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1100-1150 
Carrie Classon Smith , cclasson@unm.edu

224.006: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1100-1150
Daniel Berger, dberg006@unm.edu

224.007: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1400-1450
Matthew Maruyama, reidmaruyama@gmail.com

224.008: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 0930-1045
Michael A Noltemeyer, man@unm.edu

240.001: Traditional Grammar

MWF 1000-1050 
Bethany Davila, bdavila@unm.edu

This course covers the many levels of structure working in English--from sounds to words to sentences to discourse--as well as the ways speakers learn and change language over time. We examine how sounds are strung together to make words, how we take turns in conversations, where new words come from, and why Americans speak different dialects. Students gain specialized vocabulary for talking about grammar as well as analytic tools for studying language.

240.002: Traditional Grammar

TR 0930-1045
Staff

249.001: Introduction to Studies in English

W 1000-1050 
Sharon Warner, swarner@unm.edu

English 249 is a gateway course for majors, an Introduction to Studies in English. This one-credit, eight-week course acquaints students with the fields of study and prepares them to enter the major with confidence and purpose. Rhetoric and Writing, Creative and Professional Writing, Literature and Literary Criticism, as well as Critical Theory and Cultural Studies: These are the disciplines that make up the English Department at the University of New Mexico. Through guest lectures, readings, and short assignments, students will become conversant with these disciplines and learn the skills necessary for success in upper-division classes. The English Department offers a variety of resources, advisement, and opportunities for our majors. Studen ts will be introduced to English Honors, Sigma Tau Delta, and Departmental Scholarships. Finally, the course will provide students with advice on how to parlay the degree into an interesting career.

249.002: Introduction to Studies in English

W 1000-1050 
Sharon Warner, swarner@unm.edu

English 249 is a gateway course for majors, an Introduction to Studies in English. This one-credit, eight-week course acquaints students with the fields of study and prepares them to enter the major with confidence and purpose. Rhetoric and Writing, Creative and Professional Writing, Literature and Literary Criticism, as well as Critical Theory and Cultural Studies: These are the disciplines that make up the English Department at the University of New Mexico. Through guest lectures, readings, and short assignments, students will become conversant with these disciplines and learn the skills necessary for success in upper-division classes. The English Department offers a variety of resources, advisement, and opportunities for our majors. Students will be introduced to English Honors, Sigma Tau Delta, and Departmental Scholarships. Finally, the course will provide students with advice on how to parlay the degree into an interesting career.

250.001: 

Literary Textual Analysis

MWF 1100-1150 
Gail Houston, ghouston@unm.edu

Undergraduate English majors, minors, second majors who love literature: this class is for you!  When you take English 250 Introduction to English Studies, you will need to write at least 4 literary criticism papers on theory and literature.  Taught by the chair of the English Department, who has published 4 literary criticism books and a Ph.D. student in Literature, how can you go wrong?

250.002: Literary Textual Analysis

TR 1700-1815
Ann D'Orazio, dorazio@unm.edu

This course will introduce students to terminology, practices, and theories that inform literary study. We will read and analyze a variety of texts in multiple genres--poetry, short fiction, the novel, the comic book/graphic novel, and non-fiction--to locate and understand how readers and texts engage in the messy process of cultural production. Selections of literary theory and criticism will accompany our primary readings. This course will familiarize students with major critical paradigms such as Marxism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Postcolonial Studies, and Cultural Studies. This course will enable students to develop and hone close reading, analytical writing, argumentation, and research skills.

250.003: Literary Textual Analysis

TR 1230-1345 
Kathryn Wichelns, wichelns@unm.edu

This course will provide students with the methodological and theoretical tools necessary to college-level reading and analysis of literatures in English.  We will examine how select works of drama, poetry, and fiction reflect the complex history of the development of the category of "literature." In our close engagements with Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Marianne Moore, Suzan-Lori Parks and others, we will address the influence of sociopolitical and historical forces as well as intellectual and artistic movements on theories of reading and critical writing.  Through regular writing assignments, students will learn how to engage in close reading, focused research, and comparative analysis.  A final research paper of 8 -10 pages in length will require students to demonstrate their ability to present a clear, informed, and compelling argument about literary works and back it up with specific, relevant textual evidence.

250.005: Literary Textual Analysis

MWF 1000-1050
Katherine Alexander, kalex@unm.edu

This English 250 Class offers an exciting multi-modal approach to critical theory as it aims to demystify this sometimes intimidating field of study. In addition to lectures, students will have the opportunity to engage in class activities and provocative readings both in theory and literature. Critical theory is a wonderful tool that enriches our understanding of literature. The class offers a survey of trends in late nineteenth and twentieth-century literary theory including Formalism, Structuralism, Deconstruction, Poststructuralism, Marxism, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis. Some time will also be devoted to Postcolonial theory. Works in poetry, fiction, and drama will provide the foundations for theoretical analyses. Several films will be shown during the course of the semester. Students will be expected to write four short papers and display their knowledge of terms in three short exams focusing on poetry, fiction, and drama. Other assignments will include several class presentations and weekly on-line blog entries. If you want to enrich your understanding of literature and critical theory, this is the class for you.

264.001: Survey of Native Literatures and Rhetorics

TR 1530-1645 
Julie Williams, juliew@unm.edu

In this course, we will study the oral and written texts produced by the Native peoples of the US. Through analysis of creation stories, legends, oratory, autobiographies, short stories, poems, and novels, we will gain a broad knowledge of the textual production of Native peoples. We will approach this literature both from an aesthetic standpoint, analyzing its form, style, and use of language, and consider these texts within their cultural contexts, exploring issues of gender, race, class, colonialism, and nationalism. Along the way, we will acquire a broad base of Native American literary history, and hone our critical reading and thinking skills through written analysis, research, and discussion.

290.001: Introduction to Professional Writing

TR 1700-1815 
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

The main purpose of ENGL 290 is to give you a basic understanding of what professional writers and editors do. This course introduces you to the practices and procedures of professional writing and editing. It also covers career opportunities available in professional writing. You will learn about expository writing style, persuasion, and document design. You will also learn how to deal with ethical situations that often arise in corporate, professional, private, and public workplaces.Projects in this course will guide you through the process of document development and introduce you to the most common genres of workplace writing. These projects are designed to help you create some initial materials for a portfolio you can use when looking for an internship or employment in the field.

290.002: Introduction to Professional Writing

MWF 1400-1450 
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

The main purpose of ENGL 290 is to give you a basic understanding of what professional writers and editors do. This course introduces you to the practices and procedures of professional writing and editing. It also covers career opportunities available in professional writing. You will learn about expository writing style, persuasion, and document design. You will also learn how to deal with ethical situations that often arise in corporate, professional, private, and public workplaces.Projects in this course will guide you through the process of document development and introduce you to the most common genres of workplace writing. These projects are designed to help you create some initial materials for a portfolio you can use when looking for an intern ship or employment in the field.

292.001: World Lit-Ancient through 16C

TR 1400-1515
Feroza Jusswalla, fjussawa@unm.edu

This course is a Survey of World Literatures from the beginnings to the 16th Century. We will be using the Norton Anthology of World Literatures, Shorter 3rd edition, volume 1. We will treat some religious texts as literature, the Bible, the Koran, the Ramayana and Bhagvad Gita study other literatures, Mayan, Chinese, Japanese and build up to Shakespeare and the European Renaissance. though Hamlet is included in your text, please purchase the Tempest as a separate text to conclude the course with.

292.002: World Lit-Ancient through 16C

TR 1400-1515
Doaa Omran, domran@unm.edu

This course is a Survey of World Literatures from the beginnings to the 16th Century. We will be using the Norton Anthology of World Literatures, Shorter 3rd edition, volume 1. We will treat some religious texts as literature, the Bible, the Koran, the Ramayana and Bhagvad Gita study other literatures, Mayan, Chinese, Japanese and build up to Shakespeare and the European Renaissance. though Hamlet is included in your text, please purchase the Tempest as a separate text to conclude the course with.

293.001: World Lit-17C through Present

TR 1100-1215
Feroza Jusswalla, fjussawa@unm.edu

This is a course in the second half of World Literatures. We will use the Norton Anthology of World Literature shorter 3rd edition vol. 2. The emphasis will be on Postcoloniality and the break up of empire and on major world writers Tagore to Derek Walcott, after a quick survey of canonical writers, Blake, Emily Dickinson, Yeats, Eliot, keeping the focus on resistances.

293.002: World Lit-17C through Present

TR 1100-1215
Doaa Omran , domran@unm.edu

This is a course in the second half of World Literatures. We will use the Norton Anthology of World Literature shorter 3rd edition vol. 2. The emphasis will be on Postcoloniality and the break up of empire and on major world writers Tagore to Derek Walcott, after a quick survey of canonical writers, Blake, Emily Dickinson, Yeats, Eliot, keeping the focus on resistances.

294.001: Survey of Earlier English Lit

TR 1700-1815 
Justin Larsen, jlarsen1@unm.edu

Take a whirlwind tour of the beginnings of English literature! This course is a necessarily brief but wide-reaching introduction that will guide students through the literature of the Anglo-Saxons, their Anglo-Norman inheritors, and the English nation that followed thereafter. We will read broadly from the most important writers of the times, focusing our attention on the connections between each writer and work with the next, allowing for an understanding of the threads of influence that lead us to our current cultural climate. We will examine different genres (hagiography, drama, satire, etc.), forms (alliterative verse, sonnets, heroic couplets, etc.), historical contexts (the Norman Conquest, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, etc.), and even important details such as language (Old, Middle, and Modern English) and text production and consumption (manuscripts vs. printed texts).

294.002: Survey of Earlier English Lit

TR 0930-1045 
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

The Greatest Hits of the Early Years! Monsters, drunken louts, transvestites, and Satan! This course introduces students to the developments of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Middle English and Early Modern periods into the Enlightenment. We will read representative and important works from those eras within their historical and cultural contexts. We will explore issues of race and gender, the introduction of literacy, and changing conceptions of writing and genre. 

294.003: Survey of Earlier English Lit

TR 0930-1045 
Kevin Jackson, kevin.scott.jackson@gmail.com

The Greatest Hits of the Early Years! Monsters, drunken louts, transvestites, and Satan! This course introduces students to the developments of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Middle English and Early Modern periods into the Enlightenment. We will read representative and important works from those eras within their historical and cultural contexts. We will explore issues of race and gender, the introduction of literacy, and changing conceptions of writing and genre.

296.002: Earlier American Literature

MWF 0900-0950 
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman, mviz@unm.edu

This course surveys American literature from the time of contact and conquest to the first half of the nineteenth century. It pays particular attention to Puritan settlement and Spanish colonization, and the impact of both on Native American communities. In addition to focusing on major English writers and literary movements, the class will also consider Native American creation stories and oral narratives, a s well as Spanish and Mexican American narratives, both oral and written. This is a large section class.

296.004: Earlier American Literature

MW 1700-1815 
Karen Roybal, kroybal1@unm.edu

This course surveys American literature from the time of contact and conquest to the first half of the nineteenth century. Through course readings, discussions, lectures, and assignments we will explore the meaning of the cultural, religious, racial, and human interactions in early America. The course readings are taken from a variety of sources: letters, autobiographies, speeches and traditional literature, and are produced by men and women whose encounters and experiences provide a new lens from which we can understand the meaning of "American" literature. We will cover a broad range of texts and oral narratives--from Native American creation stories, to Spanish, Mexican, and African American discovery and slave narratives, to the major English writers and literary movements--to help you understand that literature is significant because it tells valuable stories about our culture.

297.001: Later American Literature

TR 1230-1345 
Daniel Worden, dworden@unm.edu

This course will survey U.S. literary history from 1865 to the present. Over the course of the semester, we will study works from major styles, movements, and forms in American literature, including regionalism, realism, naturalism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, confessional poetry, the New Journalism, postmodernism, and the contemporary novel. American literary history is a contested terrain, and accordingly, this course is designed to foreground the central themes, problems, and concerns of American literature. Readings will include prose and poetry by a number of American writers, as well as three novels about the question of the “individual” in America: Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, and Colson Whitehead’s Zone One. Course assignments will include two short essays, along with midterm and final exams.

300-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

304.001: Bible as Literature

TR 1100-1215 
Janet Gaines, jhgaines@unm.edu

The Bible contains some of the most powerful stories of all time.  This course will explore the literary/critical possibilities for reading biblical sagas of love and war, faith and doubt, salvation and degradation.  We will examine literary elements of biblical tales, determine how these narratives have shaped our culture, and study what they reveal about our world.  Units of study include heroic narratives (including non-traditional heroes such as Jezebel and Lilith), history of the Davidic monarchy (from Saul through Jesus), and wisdom literature and poetry (such as Job and Psalms), prophetic literature (several Minor Prophets), the letter as literature (the writings of Paul and his contemporaries), and apocalyptic literature (strains of Joel, Ezekiel, and Daniel that reappear in Revelations).  

Mid-term, final, and one analytical or creative seven-page paper.

305.001: Mythology

T 0930-1045 
Renee Faubion, sanren@unm.edu

This class will provide students with a survey of archetypes and theories of myth, including creation stories, marriage, the scapegoat, and a variety of interpretations of the hero pattern. Those patterns and theories will be considered by reading and analysis of a cross-section of myths from a variety of cultures. Featured texts will include The Odyssey, Ovid's Metamorphoses, The Ramayana, and selections from The Prose Edda, the Bible, and the Popol Vuh. Course requirements will include three exams, three essays, and a variety of short assignments.

315.002: Interdisc Approaches to Lit

TR 1230-1345
Belinda Wallace, bwallace@unm.edu

315.003: Intro to Harlem Renaissance

TR 1400-1515
Finnie Coleman, coleman@unm.edu

315.004: Interdisc Approaches to Lit

TR 1100-1215
TBA

315.005: Interdisc Approaches to Lit

T 1730-2000
Carlos A. Contreras, soothxsayer@unm.edu

315.006: Interdisc Approaches to Lit

W 1600-1830
Levi Romero, xlromero@unm.edu

321.001: Intermediate Creative Writing Fiction

MW 1600-1715 
Jack Trujillo, jacktru@unm.edu

This is a craft-based class in short literary fiction. The focus of our work is the specific elements of craft that writers (that's you) use to construct stories and an examination, using your own writing and the writing of others, of how those craft elements can be manipulated to achieve different narrative ends. The first half of the semester is spent attacking, in multiple ways, the first short story you write: changing point of view, starting the story at an entirely new place, or removing back story, for example. The second half of the semester is spent workshopping a second story written for the class. Both stories have specific limitations and rules. Class requires much writing, much reading, two complete stories, a live reading re view, a craft review of a collection of short fiction and written critiques of each of your fellow student's stories. Texts are Deepening Fiction by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren and a collection of short fiction chosen by me.

321.002: Intermediate Creative Writing Fiction

TR 1100-1215 
Jack Trujillo, jacktru@unm.edu

This is a craft-based class in short literary fiction. The focus of our work is the specific elements of craft that writers (that's you) use to construct stories and an examination, using your own writing and the writing of others, of how those craft elements can be manipulated to achieve different narrative ends. The first half of the semester is spent attacking, in multiple ways, the first short story you write: changing point of view, starting the story at an entirely new place, or removing back story, for example. The second half of the semester is spent workshopping a second story wri tten for the class. Both stories have specific limitations and rules. Class requires much writing, much reading, two complete stories, a live reading review, a craft review of a collection of short fiction and written critiques of each of your fellow student's stories. Texts are Deepening Fiction by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren and a collection of short fiction chosen by me.

321.010: Intermediate Creative Writing Fiction

Online
Julie Shigekuni, jshig@unm.edu

322.001: Intermediate Creative Writing Poetry

TR 0930-1045
Luci Tapahonso, tapahons@unm.edu

323.001: Intermediate Creative Writing Nonfiction

MW 1600-1715
Marisa P. Clark, clarkmp@unm.edu 

323.002: Intermediate Creative Writing Nonfiction

TR 1230-1345 
Diane Thiel, dthiel@unm.edu

In this intermediate creative nonfiction course, we will explore a number of sub-categories, including travel narrative, personal essay, and memoir, among others. Though the sub-genres of creative nonfiction are generally thought of as distinct, several areas often overlap in a single piece. This course will have a strong focus on memoir, travel writing and personal essay, but will also delve into other forms of nonfiction as well. We will read a number of shorter pieces of creative nonfiction by writers such as Judith Ortiz Cofer, Sherman Alexie, and Diane Ackerman, as well as essays about the writing of creative nonfiction, by writers such as Lee Gutkind, and Margaret Atwood. The course will include extensive and intensive weekly workshop of students' writing and provide a variety of writing exercises to address specific elements of writing creative nonfiction. Students will be responsible for two longer pieces of creative nonfiction, revisions, a revision narrative, as well as weekly peer reviews.

324.001: Introduction to Screenwriting

F 1030-1315 UNM West
William Nevins, wnevins@unm.edu

This is an introductory course to the art and craft of screen writing. No experience needed, but an interest in creative writing and in films and tv series is encouraged. Text is David Trottier, The Screenwriter's Bible, with additional texts and dvds recommended. Students will be introduced to the history of screenwriting and to recent trends and developments. Class follows a supportive peer-input workshop model. Each student will be expected to write one full screen play, of whatever length. Students are encouraged to obtain screen writing software such as Celtx, Final Draft or others (some of which are available at little or not cost). We will view relevant films and videos and guest speakers are expected to visit. Instructor Bill Nevins has been involved in film making and writing about film and screen writers for many years. Prereqs will be waived upon request. Contact wnevins@unm.edu or bill_nevins@yahoo.com

324.003: Introduction to Screenwriting

T 1800-2100 
Matthew McDuffie, mcduffie@unm.edu

330.001: Women of the Bible

TR 1400-1515 
Janet Gaines, jhgaines@unm.edu

Stories about women in the Bible and Apocrypha have profoundly affected not only the way women traditionally understand themselves but also the way men perceive women.  For centuries the biblical propensity to categorize women as either good or evil has prevailed.  This course seeks to interpret and challenge conventional views by focusing on female characters and their diverse roles.  Units of study include rebels; matriarchs; prophets; wives, mothers, daughters, and sisters; royal women; concubines; tempters and harlots; abused and raped women; goddesses; women at the margins.  Students will take a mid-term and final exam and write one paper.

331.001: T: Introduction to China

MW 1400-1515
X. He

331.002: T: Egyptian Literature & Cult

TR 1400-1515
M. Ali

333.001: T: Ancient Drama & Stagecraft

TR 1100-1215
O. Umurhan

334.001: T: Magic in Ancient Religion

TR 1230-1345
Luke Gorton, lagorton@unm.edu

336.001: T: Fairy Tales

TR 1230-1345
S. Baackmann

338.001: T: Love & Sex in Russian Literature

MW 1400-1515
Lisa Woodson, lwoodson@unm.edu

339.001: T: Supernatural Japan

MW 1400-1515
Lorie Brau, lbrau@unm.edu

Much of recent Japanese popular culture has featured supernatural elements, from the oni (monsters) of anime to the avenging female ghosts with long black hair in J-Horror films. This class will deepen your understanding of Japanese ghosts, demons, and paranormal phenomena by placing them in context, introducing the folklore that engendered them and some of the literary works that have given them life from the Heian period (794-1185) to the present. We will be considering questions like the following: What can supernatural stories tell us about Japanese religious beliefs, history and cultural values? What factors influence how supernatural beings and events are represented in different literary genres at different historical periods? What effects do the stories have on their readers? If this class interests you, please sign up under JAPN or COMP 339.

339.002: T: Modern Japanese Literature

TR 1400-1515
A. Haag

349.001: From Beowulf to Arthur

MWF 0900-0950 
Christine Kozikowski

This course serves as an introductory survey of early and later British medieval literature between 700 - 1450 AD. The texts, originally in Old and Middle English, Welsh, Latin, and Anglo-Norman will be read in Modern English translations, though some time will be spent on specific terms in the vernacular and the difficulties of accurate translation. The course aims to give students a basic knowledge of the variety and range of the genres of the period, including epic, romance, drama, lyrics, history, myths, saint's lives, and inscriptions, as well as to impress upon the student the continuity and cultural complexity of medieval literature. The course will be augmented by art-historical presentations, manuscript studies and paleography exercises, and discussions about historiography and feminist critique. Texts: Beowulf (Seamus Heaney translation), The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Medieval Period.

351.001: Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

MWF 1300-1350 
Christine Kozikowski

In this course, we will explore Chaucer's most famous work, the Canterbury Tales. Chaucer's collection of pilgrimage tales is one of the greatest, most imaginative, and varied pieces of all English literature. Consider its fascinating historical backdrop in late fourteenth century England: a generation prior, the plague had swept through Europe decimating the population; political unrest and religious turmoil; a child king had taken the throne; peasants rose up in rebellion; the Bible was translated into English; and heretics were burned at the stake--a world of both decay and renewal, of catastrophic violence and decline for some, but dazzling possibility for others. Through the voices of colorful storytellers, Chaucer's last great poem tests the boundaries of social possibility in a "disenchanted" age, weighing the competing claims of allegory and realism, chivalry and commerce, men and women, traditional authority and individual experience. And it does so in our ancestor language of Middle English, simultaneously a colorful, earthy, and lofty idiom. We will, in essence, ride along with the pilgrims on our own journey to Canterbury and through the Middle Ages.

352.001: Early Shakespeare

TR 1230-1345 
Carmen Nocentelli, nocent@unm.edu

We will read and discuss plays penned during the early part of Shakespeare's career, including The Taming of the Shrew,Titus AndronicusRomeo and JulietA Midsummer Night's DreamThe Merchant of Venice, and Henry V. There will be relatively little lecturing, and you will be required to attend regularly, read all assigned material carefully, and contribute thoughtfully to class discussion. A variety of written assignments will complement our in-class activities and familiarize you with basic research tools.

352.010: Early Shakespeare

Online 
Renee Faubion, sanren@unm.edu

Come meet one of the greatest writers in all of literature! In addition to close study of the texts themselves, students will receive instruction in cultural trends influential to Shakespeare's work (regarding developments in economic classes and Renaissance notions of race, for example); in Elizabethan history and theatrical conventions; and in some of the most important sources for the plays and poetry. Students will also perform assignments requiring them to review and respond to scholarship on Shakespeare's work. Readings will include Titus Andronicus; Romeo and Juliet; The Merchant of Venice; Much Ado about Nothing; Henry IV [parts I and II]; and Hamlet. Course requirements will include three papers, a variety of short assignments, and a research project.

353.001: Later Shakespeare: Shakespeare's Performable Actions

MWF 1100-1150 
Marissa Greenberg, marissag@unm.edu

(A course designed for students in the Department of Theatre and Dance) King Lear, Othello, Lady Macbeth, Hermione, Ariel--these characters' rich inner lives and imaginative histories shape their performance onstage. But how do these characters move? In this course, we will examine a selection of Shakespeare's most spectacular plays, including King LearOthello,MacbethThe Winter's Tale, and The Tempest, in search of evidence of performable actions--gesture, prop use, facial expression, dance, and entrances and exits. Aimed at majors and minors in theater arts and dance, this course will introduce students to a range of critical methods by which to detect performable actions in Shakespeare's plays. Students should expect to read both plays and scholarly works, to write several short essays, and to participate actively in class discussion.

353.002: Later Shakespeare: Shakespeare Then and Now

MWF 1000-1050 
Marissa Greenberg, marissag@unm.edu

(A course designed f or students in the Department of English) In the latter part of his career, Shakespeare wrote some of his most powerful and enduring works, including King LearOthelloMacbethThe Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. These plays continue to fascinate because of their haunting representations of racial hatred, violence against women, political ambition, and personal redemption. In this course, we will read these and other plays as both dramatic poems and theatrical scripts. Aimed at majors and minors in English, this course explores the way original audiences understood the language, performance, and culture of Shakespeare's plays. Through modern-day stage productions and films, we will also examine how understandings of these works have changed over time. Students should expect to complete short assignments that culminate in a formal research project.

360.001: William Faulkner

MWF 1000-1050
Antonio Márquez, amarquez@unm.edu

This course will examine significant works by the greatest American fiction writer of the twentieth century. Concentrating on textual analysis and criticism, we will examine the technical and thematic elements of the Faulkner canon and consider the social, cultural and intellectual currents that shaped Faulkner and his work. The journey through Faulkner's world can be challenging, intimidating, perplexing and frustrating; in its best moments, it can also be exciting, profound, and emotionally and intellectually rewarding. Faulkner was a writer's writer as well and his influence extends from Gabriel Garcia Márquez to Cormac McCarthy. Readings: Flags In The Dust, The Sound and The Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctuary, Light In August, Go Down Moses, Intruder In The Dust, and The Reivers.

381.001: African American Literature II

TR 1400-1515 
Kadeshia Matthews, kadeshia@unm.edu

A survey of 20th century African American literature from the 1910s to the 1980s. We will examine fiction, poetry and non-fiction prose from writers associated with the Harlem Renaissance, the Chicago Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement and Womanism/Black Feminism, as well as from those authors who do not fit comfortably into these schools or movements. In addition to the creative works themselves, we will consider the recurrent debates within African American literary circles about the existence, role or purpose of, and audience for African American cultural production. Likely assignments include two short essays, an exam and an oral presentation. Also crosslisted as AFST 381.001.

387.001: Postcolonial Short Story

MWF 1100-1150
Belinda Deneen Wallace, bwallace@unm.edu

Postcolonial literature is writing which addresses the impact of the "imperial process from the moment of colonization to the present day" (Ashcroft et al, 2). Under the umbrella of reclamation, students will examine postcolonial short stories that affirm the complexities and validity of indigenous and formerly colonized cultures, traditions, and languages that were systematically suppressed in order to privilege the social and cultural predilections and conventions of the colonizer. To this end, students will explore issues of race, identity, nation, gender, hybridity, and "othering," as they unpack they ways in which authors use literature as a means toward liberation.

388.001: French Cinema

T 1600-1830 
R. Vallury

397.001: Regional Literature

TR 1100-1215
Kadeshia Matthews, kadeshia@unm.edu

400-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

412.001: Writers & Players: English and Irish Theater and Fiction 1700-1890

MW 1400-1515 
Carolyn Woodward, woodward@unm.edu

This Honors/Capstone Seminar will focus on the lived experiences of fiction writers and playwrights in 18th and 19th century England and Ireland.  We will read Aphra Behn's stage comedy The Rover (1677) and novel The Fair Jilt (1688), Henry Fielding's stage farce The Tragedy of Tragedies (1731) and novel Joseph Andrews (1742), Richard Brinsley Sheridan's stage comedy The Rivals (1775) and his later speeches in parliament, and Oscar Wilde's stage comedy The Importance of Being Earnest (1895) and novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890).  We will investigate the theater work of each of these writers: for example, Behn, who wrote theatre theory as well, lived in a wild area of London just behind the theatre for which she wrote.  Fielding's theatre company included fa mous actors of the time, while the political satire he wrote finally drove him from the stage.  Sheridan's father was an elocutionist and his mother a playwright and novelist; he himself became a powerful theatre manager.  Wilde's work in aestheticism (theories of the beautiful in art) shaped both his novel and the stage comedy we'll read, while his engagement in law and politics eventually led to his own trial for "gross indecency" with men. In this writing-intensive seminar, you will contribute several questions for discussion, write frequent short papers, and produce one substantial research paper (with or without a creative component).  Through reading, discussion and practice, you will strengthen your critical methodologies (close reading; deconstruction) and theoretical approaches (history, culture, gender).  I expect active participation.

414.001: Documentation

MW 1700-1615 
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

Are you interested in documenting technical processes, composing technical specifications, usability testing, and data visualization? Consider enrolling in ENGL 413, Documentation. Technical Writers of all stripes engage in some form of documentation, whether it is keeping track of progress on a project, composing user-centered texts such as manuals, or charting information architecture paths. This course is designed to prepare students for documenting in a variety of professional contexts In this course, students learn theories underlying documentation processes, create data visualizations, compose process and instruction manuals which they will ultimately conduct usability testing on. Students will be exposed to traditional and single-sourcing documentation approaches, and will pay attention to emerging documentation approaches being experimented with in industry.

417.001: Editing

MWF 0900-0950
Monica Kowal, kowal1@unm.edu

In this class, you will learn how to edit technical documents, from proofreading for errors at the surface to ensuring that the document contains appropriate content, organization, and visuals for audiences. Students will also learn how to use traditional editing marks, editing functions within word processing software, and principles of layout and design. This class will feature a service-learning component in that students will benefit from working with real clients on real editing projects. A choice of final project with a contracted client will give students the opportunity to interview and negotiate with clients and consider readers needs and expectations. Your editing experience will have an enhanced sense of value when you can earn the respect of clients and anticipate their editing needs.

417.002: Editing

TR 1400-1515 
Andrew Bourelle, abourelle@unm.edu

English 417 will focus on technical and professional editing. In addition to proofreading for punctuation, mechanics, and spelling, students will practice editing documents for consistency, accuracy, usability, and audience consideration. The class is intended for students interested in careers in technical and professional writing; however, the emphasis on the precision of language will be applicable to any students interested in improving their writing or editing skills. 

418.001: Proposal & Grant Writing

TR 0930-1045
Kyle Fiore, kfiore@unm.edu

The purpose of this course is to learn how to write effective non profit documents, including appeals letters, news letters and, most importantly, grant proposals. You will analyze existing non-profit documents and proposals to understand the rhetorical moves they make. You will also learn how to locate and evaluate requests for proposals to ensure the proposal you write contains information necessary to persuade a client or funder that they should fund your project. Writing for non-profits is seldom a solitary task. Rather, most documents real world non profit writers create involve working in a team to gather information, identify needs, locate opportunities, and develop persuasive descriptions and solutions. To accomplish this need for real world experience, the major documents for this course will be written for a local organization in a service learning experience.

418.002: Proposal & Grant Writing

TR 1230-1345
Kyle Fiore, kfiore@unm.edu

The purpose of this course is to learn how to write effective non profit documents, including appeals letters, news letters and, most importantly, grant proposals. You will analyze existing non-profit documents and proposals to understand the rhetorical moves they make. You will also learn how to locate and evaluate requests for proposals to ensure the proposal you write contains information necessary to persuade a client or funder that they should fund your project. Writing for non-profits is seldom a solitary task. Rather, most documents real world non profit writers create involve working in a team to gather information, identify needs, locate opportunities, and develop persuasive descriptions and solutions. To accomplish this need for real world experience, the major documents for this course will be written for a local organization in a service learning experience.

419.001: Visual Rhetoric

TR 1530-1645 
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

This course covers the basic principles of graphic design that writers should understand when creating documents for professional contexts. Our goal is to be able to do quality basic layout and design work and to be able to talk sensibly to professional designers. Visual Rhetoric is defined as the art of using images to inform or persuade. A course in visual rhetoric, therefore, purposes to introduce students to the working vocabulary of this rhetoric, as well as the fundamentals of theory and practice associated with document design. In ENGL 419, we learn how to employ principles of effective document design and visual argumentation. We learn how visual elements contribute to and affect the meaning of documents. We study various aspects of document design, including layout, use of headings, typography, photos, illustrations, charts, tables, and graphs. The assignments in the course involve a series of projects that can ultimately become part of a professional portfolio.

420.001: Writing with Tropes

TR 0800-0915 
Jerome Shea, jshea@unm.edu

This course focuses on rhetorical tropes and schemes, on recognizing them and using them in our writing. You will develop a store of useful tropes to amaze your friends and confound your enemies. Not only will we write, but we will analyze other writings, learning to spot the coy apophasis, the elusive hypophora, the whimsical hyperbaton, the flashy chiasmus, the modest brevitas, the pulsing polysyndeton, and many more. No exams, just writing: five or six short papers.

420.003: Legal Writing

MWF 1400-1450 
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

This course is designed to introduce students to legal writing and writing about law in its myriad forms. If you are thinking about applying to law school, are interested in the theory, practice, and history of rhetoric in legal argumentation, or you are interested in writing about the law for popular audiences, this class is for you! The course will move through three units. First, we will explore the history of legal arguments through the history of rhetoric. We will read Isocrates, Plato, Cicero, and Quintilian and explore how law and rhetoric evolved with democracy. The second unit will involve contemporary legal writing, including practicing the IRAC structure, reading and conducting research with court decisions, and examining issues pertaining to contracts and agreements. The third unit will involve writing about law for popular audiences. Students will examine how the law is written about to non-experts, and practice strategies for writing about legal topics for those audiences.

420.004: Blue Mesa Review

W 1400-1550; F 1500-1700
Emily Rapp, erapp@unm.edu

421.001: Advanced Fiction Writing

MWF 1100-1150 
Michelle Brooks, mbrooks7@juno.com

This course will focus on the writing of short stories, the writing process for all creative work, and contemporary fiction. Students will be required to write and workshop short stories. In addition to writing, students can expect to read contemporary fiction.

421.002: Advanced Fiction Workshop

TR 0930-1045 
Daniel Mueller, dmueller@unm.edu

I believe every piece of fiction has contained within it the seed, or blueprint, of what it ultimately wants to be. For the author, fully realizing a piece of fiction requires carefully listening to what the narrative is telling him or her during the act of composition, from the first sentence to the last, and at every stage of revision. In this way, it seems to me, pieces of fiction are born. Fully realized works of fiction rarely happen in single sittings; for this reason, the fully realized short story, meant to be read in a single sitting, is always a sleight-of-hand, the weeks, months, and even years the author devoted to it seamlessly concealed. For this reason, too, fiction writing must be a practice, excelled at, if such a thing is possible, only over time and by making it a routine in our lives. Responding well to another writer's fiction is, I also believe, as arduous an act of the imagination as writing fiction, for it requires us not only to imagine the fictional world summoned by the words the author has chosen, but to imagine ourselves in the author's position to his or her text. In essence, as members of a fiction workshop, we try to listen to each work as carefully as its author has and formulate in words the messages it has for him or her. In simplest terms, a fiction workshop provides serious fiction writers an invaluable opportunity to have their work read deeply and discussed deeply by a panel of equally serious fellow writers who share, in their hearts and minds, a singular commitment to bringing pieces of fiction as close as possible to completion

422.002: Advanced Poetry Workshop

TR 1100-1215
Luci Tapahonso, tapahons@unm.edu

423.001: Adv Creative Writ Nonfiction

TR 1530-1645
Staff

423.002: Adv Creative Writ Nonfiction

MW 1230-1345
Marisa Clark, clarkmp@unm.edu

424.001: Creative Writing Wrk Script

R 1700-2000
Matthew McDuffie, mcduffie@unm.edu

432.001: Inventing America, 1492-1624

TR 1100-1215 
Carmen Nocentelli, nocent@unm.edu

We will explore European representations of the "New World" through travel narratives, maps, engravings, colonial documents, essays, and plays. We will begin with the earliest records of the encounter and conclude with the romanticized encounter between "princess" Pocahontas and Captain John Smith. Primary sources will include Christopher Columbus'Journal, Bartolomé de las Casas' Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies, Hernán Cortés'Letters from Mexico, Jean de Léry's History of a Voyage to the Land of Brazil, Michel de Montaigne's "Of cannibals", Walter Ralegh's Discovery of Guiana, and Thomas Harriot's Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia. Requirements: midterm, final, and several short written assignments. This course is cross-listed in French and CLCS and is suitable for Latin American Studies students.

442.001: Major Rhetorical Texts

MW 1300-1350 
Charles Paine, cpaine@unm.edu

Since the Ancient Greeks invented it around 450 BCE, rhetoric, as Richard Lanham explains, "formed the center of what we now call 'liberal education' for most of following two and half millennia." Sometimes rhetoric is defined as the study of effective communication (speaking, writing, using images and other forms of language). It is also sometimes defined as the art of persuasion, but we'll soon discover that persuasion is an interestingly complicated idea. Kenneth Burke (a 20th-century rhetorician) defined "rhetoric: as the study of "how words work." So the study of rhetoric includes the abstract and theoretical, but the /art/ of rhetoric demands that we move through and beyond the theoretical to the practical. By studying rhetorical theory and hist ory, we all become more effective practitioners of the art--better communicators.  If we want to understand rhetoric in theory and practice, we need to go back to its historical sources, to the Greeks (who literally invented rhetoric) and to the Romans. This course will focus primarily on the works of the ancients, though we'll continually cycle back to contemporary practice and theory. We'll begin with selections from Homer's Iliad and Thucydides' History, and a contemporary speech or two, which will raise some fundamental questions about the nature of rhetoric. Then we'll start exploring the Sophists, including Protagoras, Gorgias, Isocrates, Lysias, and others. From here we study Plato's attack on rhetoric and on the Sophists, and we'll spend a great deal of time with Aristotle's theory of rhetoric as a true techne (or "art").  We'll move on to the Romans Cicero and Quintilian and finish with nineteenth-century philosopher and professor of rhetoric Friedrich Nietzsche as well as contemporary considerations of visual and. Throughout this odyssey, we'll examine these ideas not merely as historical curiosities, but as ideas that help us think about our own arts of discourse, how they work and how we (ought to) teach and study them. Throughout the course, we'll discover and forge connections between the rhetorical tradition and contemporary writing and speaking. We'll often explore contemporary and ancient speeches as a way to ground our theory and do some rhetorical inquiry. You'll be reading mostly primary texts, with some modern essays about rhetoric and ancient history. While these texts are quite challenging, I'll do my best to make them accessible to you, for instance, by giving you reading questions every day. In addition, everyone will keep an "exam preparation journal": early in the semester, I'll give you a list of essay questions from which the essay exams will be drawn and ask you to devote your journals to each question; in this way, you'll continuously be working out your answers to the big questions in the course. There will also be periodic reading quizzes just to give you a little motivation to keep up. Finally, each student will make a presentation and complete a semester project (an essay or other major work).  Texts include First Democracy: The Challenge of an Ancient Idea by Paul Woodruff and Aristotle's On Rhetoric: a Theory of Civic Discourse. I will also provide numerous articles and other texts via Blackboard Learn. If you have questions about this course, please get in touch with me. 

448.001: Advanced Old English

TR 1100-1215 
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

In this class, we will return to the earliest recorded form of English and read some of the oldest literature ever written in the language. We will read accounts of the founding of England and later Viking invasions, the lives of holy men, and the reworking of the book of Exodus into an epic poem. All readings will be done in the original Old English. Prerequisite: knowledge of Old English.

451.001: Viking Women

MW 1730-1845 
Helen Damico, hdamico@unm.edu

The theme of the course will be women's defiance of authority, of the patriarchal system, of nature and the elements, of hunger and disease. The society captures the time of settlement of Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland, and the stories exemplify the rugged life in the wilderness. The women are "defiant" of their men, traditional notions of femininity and love, and seize the right to individual action and avenge personal outrage. The course will be loosely organized in the following segments:Concubines and Matriarchs; Eroticism and CommerceExplorers and Warriors. The historical period covered will be that of the settlement from the ninth-century through early the early eleventh-century. The sagas themselves were written in largely in the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries. Why should there be this disparity of time between the events and their codification? Class readings of primary materials: Egil's Saga, Eyrbyggja Saga, Laxdaela Saga, Njal's Saga, The Vinland Sagas (Graenlendinga Saga and Eirik's Saga)The Saga of the Volsungs. Reading of Secondary Sources will be found on E-Reserves. Although the sagas will be read in translation, students who have taken one semester of the language course in Old Norse are welcome; special projects will be designed for them. Requirements: Quizzes, midterm, final, and paper. This course applies toward credit both for the minor in Medieval Studies and the requirements for the graduate programs in Medieval Studies.

456.001: British Romanticism

TR 0930-1045 
Gary Harrison, garyh@unm.edu

In this course we will read some of the major writers between 1765 or so and 1850 in the context of the development of philosophical, critical and theoretical reflection upon poetics and the "literary." Thus, alongside writers such as Goldsmith, Gray, Cowper, Blake, Coleridge, the Wordsworths, the Shelleys, Byron, and L.E.L., among others, we will read from the works of Addison, Burke, Rousseau, Kant, Schiller, Hegel and Heine. We will also read recent critical articles on romantic era literature and theory. The course will also situate our readings of romantic era writing within the cultural and political transformations of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. While the focus will primarily be upon poetry and poetics, especially Blake, Barbauld, Robin son, Smith, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron, Clare, Keats, Hemans, and L.E.L., we will also read some fiction by Jane Austen, Sydney Owensen, Mary Shelley, and possibly Emily Bronté.  Several short writing assignments and/or quizzes, as well as a critical, research-based paper will be required.

465.001: Chicano/a Literature

MW 1230-1345 
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman, mviz@unm.edu

Chicano/a literature became a recognized field in the aftermath of the Civil Rights era, and the post-Civil Rights period saw the recovery of many early twentieth-century texts. This course begins with the recovered novel, George Washington Gómez, written by Américo Paredes in the 1930s but first published by the Recovery Project in 1990. We will explore the criticism and debate about Paredes' work to understand better the field of Chicano/a literature, its canon, and its debates. Other readings include folktales, short fiction, poetry, autobiography, and essays by writers such as Jovita González, Fray Angélico Chávez, and Fabiola Cabeza de Baca from the early twentieth century, and Tomás Rivera, Cherrie Moraga, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Jimmy Santiago Baca, and Richard Rodriguez from later in the century. We will also read a range of criticism to explore the themes of region, race, and gender in the selected works, and we will consider written texts alongside of oral and visual texts that elucidate and inform Chicano/a literature. Students come away with a better understanding of the aesthetics, the culture, and the historical longevity of Chicano/a literature.

479.002: Representations of Africa

TR 1400-1515 
Walter Putnam, zarafanm@gmail.com

"Ex Africa semper aliquid novi" (Pliny) Africa is hot! Beginning with Antiquity, Pliny recognized that something new always comes out of Africa. One can hardly open the newspaper, turn on the radio or television, or walk down the street without hearing something about Africa. This course offers an exploration of the myriad discourses that have created Africa from a European perspective: historical, anthropological, literary, medical, scientific, and visual. This fascination with the fabled continent has a long genealogy extending back to Antiquity and continuing right up to contemporary Euro-American culture. Africa was not so dark until the Europeans arrived and constructed a mythical land that suited their supremacist and expansionist purposes. The representation of Africa by non-Africans raises thorny problems of racial politics, cultural practices, and the global circulation of images that attest to the European fascination and repulsion for all things African. We will read Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Chinua Achebe's famous "An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness." We will examine the fabrication, collection, and dissemination of representations that contributed to what Michel Leiris termed a "phantom Africa." This course is cross-listed in Comparative Literature and Africana Studies. It is more appropriate for graduate students but advanced, motivated undergraduates are welcome to attend. Please contact me for further information.

499.001: Internship

TR 1700-1815 
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

Are you a Professional Writing Student currently in your Junior or Senior year, and want to put all that book-learning to good use in the world beyond the university? Do you want to get credit for it? Maybe even get paid? Then you should enroll in ENGL 499. our Internship course. In our Internship course, you will develop resumes, cover letters, work on your web presence, get tips for engaging the job search, build a professional portfolio, and ponder the nature of technical and professional writing, its past, present, and future. Students are responsible to set up their own internships, however, several firms around town contact Dr. Bartolotta with opportunities, so please feel free to contact him for opportunities and "Like€ the UNM Professional Writing Program on Facebook to keep track of our most recent internship announcements.

Department of English Language and Literature
Humanities Building, Second Floor
MSC03 2170
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Phone: (505) 277-6347
Fax: (505) 277-0021

english@unm.edu