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Fall 2012 Course Descriptions

100-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

150.002: Study of Literature

MWF 2:00-2:50
Douglas Ryan VanBenthuysen

This course will introduce non-English majors to a variety of English literary works and techniques to better allow for understanding and enjoyment. This section will focus on looking at the ways poets and authors use language by closely examining works from a variety of periods. The course will begin in the Renaissance, examining poems by John Donne and a play by William Shakespeare. We will then move back in time and read Old English poetry, including Beowulf. Finally, we’ll finish up the course by reading a 20th century novel by William Faulkner. This eclectic collection of literary works will be tied together by the theme of language, and, through taking this section, you will also get an introduction to the history of the English language and learn about literary conventions such as poetic meter, literary devices, and narrative style.

200-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

219.021: Technical and Professional Writing

Online
Valerie Thomas

This course will introduce you to the different types of documents found in the workplace and give you the chance to practice writing them. This class is practical and practice-oriented. You will learn useful methods for creating effective workplace documents that you can apply immediately to a variety of documents from one-page letters to multi-page reports. As you learn to analyze and understand your readers’ needs as well as develop a coherent structure, clear style, and compelling page layout, you will be able to create documents that communicate effectively.

219.022: Technical and Professional Writing

Online
Steve Benz

English 219 focuses on how to write and design documents found in the workplace. Students create documents that are based on the needs of their readers by considering the type of research to conduct as well as the appropriate structure, writing style, and page layout to use. Assignments include creating professional letters, memos, procedures, manuals, proposals, and analytical reports.

219.024: Technical and Professional Writing

Online
Steve Benz

English 219 focuses on how to write and design documents found in the workplace. Students create documents that are based on the needs of their readers by considering the type of research to conduct as well as the appropriate structure, writing style, and page layout to use. Assignments include creating professional letters, memos, procedures, manuals, proposals, and analytical reports.

220.001: Expository Writing: Broken Societies: Genre Studies in Dystopian Literature

MWF 9:00-9:50
Carol Jean Stokes

Depicting its author's vision of a unique society, dystopian literature is fascinating, frightening, and fantastic. This course will explore genres such as totalitarian, cyberpunk, capitalistic, and post-apocalyptic dystopias within modern dystopian short stories, novels, and films. Because dystopias also function as a venue for social criticism, we will explore current topics such as individualism, government intrusion in private life, book banning, population control, and modern attempts at creating utopian societies. Class discussions and writing assignments will help students to increase their critical thinking, analysis, and writing skills. Students will improve their ability to gather, analyze, report, and interpret information through a variety of writing assignments which will include response papers, a review, literary analysis, and an annotated bibliography. Students will show evidence of their analytical and research skills as they plan and write a final position paper which addresses a critical social issue discussed in the course.

220.002: Expository Writing: The Politics of Labeling

MWF 10:00-10:50
Todd Ruecker

Hispanic, Latina/o, Chicana/o.  Negro, Black, African American.  ESL, Nonnative Speaker, Bilingual, Multilingual.  White, Gringo, Caucasian, European American.  Immigrant, Undocumented Worker, Illegal Alien.  Identity labels are a constant part of our daily lives, sometimes used without thinking but often occurring in highly political and contested spaces.  In this class, we will explore the politics surrounding labels and the implications of using different labels to describe individuals.  With readings from linguistics, philosophy, and rhetoric and composition along with analyses of mainstream media discourses, we will gain a deeper understanding of the discursive implications of labeling and its relation to identity construction.  Through a variety of writing projects, students will explore the role labeling has played in their own lives, analyze popular discourses, conduct a review of scholarly work on labeling, and conduct primary research on the role labeling has played in the lives of members of the UNM and Albuquerque communities

220.003: Expository Writing: J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings Today

MWF 11:00-11:50
Megan Abrahamson

Vastly popular, unexpectedly intellectual, and profoundly spiritual, J.R.R. Tolkien’s epic trilogy The Lord of Rings has survived its recent stint as a blockbuster trilogy to remain not only a literary classic, but even what many consider to be the foundation of the genre of modern "high" fantasy. As the father of fantasy literature, Tolkien did not simply create a genre: he created a world. Through three major writing assignments we will explore this “sub-creation” called Middle-earth, not only in the context of later interpretations (film, music, comic books, fan-fiction, and games from the past 30+ years), but also as a world in its own right, with its own geography, history, ecosystems, sentient populations with their own laws and customs, and even its own alternate cosmos. And what better time to consider Tolkien than in the semester in which Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit is released in theatres? The goal of this course is to understand why this fictional world produced by Tolkien still captivates audiences and inspires ever newer interpretations and adaptations of Middle-earth today.

220.004: Expository Writing: Technology and the Human

MWF 12:00-12:50
Erika Jungwirth

The concept of “human nature” has always been constructed in opposition to some “other.” While this “other” has most traditionally been a marginalized human population or a more generally conceived animal world, this 220 class will explore the way that technology has come to occupy the space of “other” against which notions of humanity and human nature are formed. We will begin by reading about Brian Christian’s experience in the Turing Test, a yearly test in which humans compete against computers to prove they are human to a panel of judges, in the Atlantic Monthly article “Mind vs. Machine.” As a class, we will perform a rhetorical analysis of the way that the term “human” and “computer” become loaded with a host of implied connections; the idea of what it means to be “human” is created in opposition of what it means to be a “computer”. Next, we will read the dystopian novel Feed, which depicts a world in which the Internet has been implanted in everyone’s head. The novel explores the way in which this interferes with the character’s ability to communicate, engage in extended thought processes and form relationships. Additional sources may be added to the course through WebCT postings or use of video in class to support these texts. Possibilities include short stories “The Veldt” by Ray Bradbury and “Bicentennial Man” by Isaac Asimov, movies 2001: A Space Odyssey, A.I. and The Social Network, and TV shows such as Battlestar Galactica.

220.005: Expository Writing: Picturing the Word/Reflecting the Gaze

MWF 1:00-1:50
Deborah Paczynski

Images and texts saturate our culture, today more pervasively than any time in recent or past history. Photography and writing each have a way of capturing ambiguous moral, psychological, and documentary slices of life. The art of the image and the craft of the word each mediate deeply personal and arbitrary experiences of life because of the interiority and the exteriority of their gaze.  By examining the visual rhetoric of photography and the traditional rhetoric of written text, this class will explore the intersection of these rhetorics and investigate how each informs the other. The writing and reading in this class consists of examining the lengthy tradition of writers who write about photography and photographers who write by studying photo essays, short stories, nonfiction analysis and reviews, photo exhibitions, theoretical positions, and iconic photographs. Each of these forms will serve as means to critically evaluate how knowledge and meaning are constructed within specific socio-cultural contexts, and how, as writers, we draw on images to connect us to words that help us and our readers develop relationships with ideas, places, time, and space. Students will create numerous short texts, weekly class blog entries, and work throughout the semester in varied and ongoing modes of inquiry to create a research-based final project. 

220.006: Expository Writing: Making the Medieval Woman: Saints, Sinners, Loathly Ladies, and Lovers

MWF 2:00-2:50
Colleen Dunn

“Saint,” “Sinner,” “Loathly Lady,” and “Lover”—these are just a few of the labels ascribed to women in medieval literature.  This course will explore the extreme categories created for the medieval woman, and how the idea of “Woman” is actually constructed in the literature.  We will begin by examining how gender is treated in works authored by women in comparison to similar works by men.  After establishing a framework for the different ideas and the language used to describe them, we will explore the various categories of the medieval woman, beginning with the saint (including the warrior saints found in Old English and transvestite saints, such as Joan of Arc), then moving on to loathly ladies and mischief makers, using Sir Gawain and the Green Knight as the main text.  Finally, we will examine the Arthurian lover found in Yvain and in excerpts from Thomas Malory’s Le Morte Darthur.  We will end the course by looking at modern interpretations of the medieval woman, and tracing these interpretations back to their earlier counterparts.  The goal of this course is to examine how the idea of the “woman” is created in the literature, and how this process both reflects and creates a sense of social identity.

220.007: Expository Writing: Rhetorical Comedy in American Film

MWF 3:00-3:50
Joseph Serio

Students will write about modern issues as they are presented in film comedies ranging from the 1930s to today, how arguments about these issues are presented, and how humor is used to further and empower these arguments. The issues will include but not be limited to war/politics, sexuality, masculinity/femininity, Hollywood culture, and technology. Film criticism techniques, rhetorical devices and argumentative styles will be studied and employed. Despite the focus on comedy, genre differences will also come into play; parodies of other genres, mockumentary, satire, and film versions of classic comedic literature are included.

220.008: Expository Writing

TR 5:00-6:15
Marisa P. Clark

English 220 is an expository writing course designed to hone and advance your academic and critical reading and writing skills. In this section, we will focus on the genre of book-length comics and assess their value as works of art and literature. We will look specifically at graphic memoirs as a medium for conveying stories from the artist-author’s life; we will also look at how aspects of history and culture serve as a backdrop for these stories. Naturally, we will examine how image and words work together to enrich a text. Given that comics is so often viewed as a childish genre, we will give ample consideration to the target audience for such works. Does the use of pictures allow for a broader readership? Is the storyline ever made more simplistic because of the dependency on pictures? Do the pictures clarify certain elements of the written text or add complexity and depth to the artist-author’s perspective? Does the style of the artwork affect the readability of the book?

While the bulk of our reading will be graphic works such as Maus, Persepolis, and Fun Home, we will also look at a few traditional essay-length memoirs for comparative purposes. Writing assignments will arise from our discussions and analyses of readings, and in addition to short essays and a research paper, we will also work on a graphic project of our own. (Yes, I know this isn’t an art class! The quality of your artwork won’t be part of your grade; your effort will.) Please email me at clarkmp@unm.edu if you would like more information.

220.021: Expository Writing: What’s so Wild about the West?

Online
Erin Murrah-Mandril

This online course will develop student writing through the exploration of various texts including historical documents, literature, film and other visual images of the US west. We will examine the west as an imaginative space that produces a concrete impact in the lived experiences of people in the west from the 1800s to the present. Through analyzing these various cultural productions students will develop advanced strategies of rhetorical analysis and apply these skills to plan effective writing within their own unique rhetorical situation. The course will culminate in an independent writing project in which students develop research strategies for finding appropriate scholarly material to support a sustained argument about an aspect of US western culture. By the end of the course, students will be able to evaluate sources for quality, validity and appropriateness, and structure their own documents to create a rhetorically complete presentation of their understanding and interpretation of the US West and its ramifications for the people who live there. This is a multimedia course that incorporates print, film and Internet sources with both textual and visual representations of the west.

220.022: Expository Writing: Pop-culture Archetypes

Online
Caroline Gabe

Using examples from current and past pop culture, this course will explore the classical archetypes that help to create timeless figures. The course will introduce students to the connection between our contemporary culture and historic, mythological, and iconic archetypes. Well known books and movies like Lord of the Rings,Star Wars, and Harry Potter incorporate a standard set of archetypical characters. Both the historic roots and modern implications of such archetypes will be explored and critiqued in this course. The course is roughly divided into six topics – background on archetypes, male archetypes, female archetypes, ensembles, ambiguous archetypes, and real world archetypical individuals. This initial work will lay the foundation for students to find and analyze an archetype and its history in individual research for the final semester project.

220.023: Expository Writing: Relationship Advice in Popular Culture

Online
Annarose Fitzgerald

In this 220 section, we’ll be examining the rhetoric of relationships, from friendship to dating, spouses to siblings, roommates to neighbors in academic and popular articles, film clips, song lyrics, and other texts that articulate how relationship dynamics work. Through readings, class discussions, and written responses on a variety of styles and genres of texts, we’ll explore the voices that have shaped—and continue to shape—our understanding of relationship dynamics in today’s world, and work on developing voices of our own.

220.033: Expository Writing: Reading and Writing Our Communities - Language, Power, Identity, and Community Engagement

TR 12:30-10:45
Brian Hendrickson

In this course, students will develop their own writing identities as emerging scholars by considering how language, power and identity influence how we read (are shaped by) and write (shape) our communities. By actively, collaboratively, and critically engaging with course readings, community-based research, and the writing process itself, students will practice and reflect upon the moves made by successful academic writers, gain a greater understanding of the complexity of issues related to language, power and identity within their own communities, and explore the strategies of community writing centers and other community literacy initiatives for acting as responsible agents of change.

220.035: Expository Writing: The Graphic Novel

MWF 8:00-8:50
Vincent Basso

Comic books represent a unique narrative form, a merging of rhetoric and sequential art, which holds an important place in American and global popular culture. The comic seems to traditionally mediate a sense of possibility within the childhood imaginary, yet as the form has evolved we’ve come to find thematically mature explorations of identity, political agency, comedy, and pathos in the form of the comic book or graphic novel. Comics today are an area of serious scholarship and artistic productivity, and, as such, our class will consider how this form of literature works to articulate arguments and representations of cultural fact and fantasy. Our class will develop the analytical skills necessary for critique of the graphic form, and write critically and creatively in response to it. In addition to assigned readings and class discussion, work for this class will consist of regular writing assignments inclusive of project proposals, book reviews, genre analyses, comic scripts, as well as a final 8 to 10 page critical essay.

220.036: Expository Writing: War, Famine and Zombies - The End is Nigh

TR 9:30-10:45
Emilee Howland-Davis

As we head into the last half of 2012 the ideas of an ending world are all around us. Apocalyptic fiction is very popular and numerous authors have explored this concept in a variety of ways. In this class we will examine how apocalyptic writers frame their end-of-the-world narratives. The class will cover two sections, one on environmental apocalypse such as war or famine and a second section that will concentrate on more Science Fiction ideas such as the zombie apocalypse. After analyzing the ways that authors create dystopian worlds we will then examine a variety of apocalyptic creations such as books, poetry, movies and video games. For example we will look at The Hunger Games, World War Z, The Stand, Zombie Haiku, Logan's Run, Mad Max, Marvel Zombies and others.

220.037: Expository Writing

TR 11:00-12:15
Marisa P. Clark

English 220 is an expository writing course designed to hone and advance your academic and critical reading and writing skills. In this section, we will focus on the genre of book-length comics and assess their value as works of art and literature. We will look specifically at graphic memoirs as a medium for conveying stories from the artist-author’s life; we will also look at how aspects of history and culture serve as a backdrop for these stories. Naturally, we will examine how image and words work together to enrich a text. Given that comics is so often viewed as a childish genre, we will give ample consideration to the target audience for such works. Does the use of pictures allow for a broader readership? Is the storyline ever made more simplistic because of the dependency on pictures? Do the pictures clarify certain elements of the written text or add complexity and depth to the artist-author’s perspective? Does the style of the artwork affect the readability of the book?
While the bulk of our reading will be graphic works such as Maus, Persepolis, and Fun Home, we will also look at a few traditional essay-length memoirs for comparative purposes. Writing assignments will arise from our discussions and analyses of readings, and in addition to short essays and a research paper, we will also work on a graphic project of our own. (Yes, I know this isn’t an art class! The quality of your artwork won’t be part of your grade; your effort will.) Please email me at clarkmp@unm.edu if you would like more information.

224.002: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 2:00-3:15
Sharon Oard Warner

A beginning course in the writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction.  Introduces issues of craft, workshop vocabulary, strategies for revision, and the habit of reading as a writer. In keeping with the catalog description, we will begin with issues of craft applicable to all four genres.  Writing exercises and readings will augment our discussions of these elements of writing. In the second six weeks, we will turn our attention to the processes of development and revision.  How do creative writers draft and revise a piece?  How do creative writers decide whether the material is most suited to the genre of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction?  At this point in the semester, we’ll begin our exploration of the four genres, using both reading and writing to guide us.   By then, you’ll have completed a number of exercises and journal entries, and these will become the fodder for the short fiction, poetry, and essays you produce.  You’ll have the opportunity to try your hand at all three, not to prove your mastery but your mettle.  We’ll write one short-short story, one short essay, and a smattering of poems. Every class session will include both writing and reading.  They are equally important and, in fact, inextricable.  While writing can be viewed as a solitary occupation it’s actually a collaborative act.    Best to know from the get-go that whatever you write will be influenced by all that you’ve read.  But you needn’t take my word for it. Here are words to the wise from several masters:

“Learning to write may be part of learning to read. For all I know, writing comes out of a superior devotion to reading.”  --Eudora Welty
“I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read.” --Samuel Johnson
“The best training is to read and write, no matter what.”  --Grace Paley
TEXT:  Stephen Minot and Thiel, Diane.  Three Genres: The Writing of Literary Prose, Poetry and Plays. 9th Edition.  New York: Prentice Hall, 2011

224.005: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 1:00-1:50
Daniel Mueller

In this course students will read, write, and discuss poems, short stories, and narrative essays and, in the process, engage with the world as writers. 

224.008: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 9:30-10:45
Sharon Oard Warner

A beginning course in the writing of fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction.  Introduces issues of craft, workshop vocabulary, strategies for revision, and the habit of reading as a writer. In keeping with the catalog description, we will begin with issues of craft applicable to all four genres.  Writing exercises and readings will augment our discussions of these elements of writing. In the second six weeks, we will turn our attention to the processes of development and revision.  How do creative writers draft and revise a piece?  How do creative writers decide whether the material is most suited to the genre of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction?  At this point in the semester, we’ll begin our exploration of the four genres, using both reading and writing to guide us.   By then, you’ll have completed a number of exercises and journal entries, and these will become the fodder for the short fiction, poetry, and essays you produce.  You’ll have the opportunity to try your hand at all three, not to prove your mastery but your mettle.  We’ll write one short-short story, one short essay, and a smattering of poems. Every class session will include both writing and reading.  They are equally important and, in fact, inextricable.  While writing can be viewed as a solitary occupation it’s actually a collaborative act.    Best to know from the get-go that whatever you write will be influenced by all that you’ve read.  But you needn’t take my word for it. Here are words to the wise from several masters:

“Learning to write may be part of learning to read. For all I know, writing comes out of a superior devotion to reading.”  --Eudora Welty
“I never desire to converse with a man who has written more than he has read.” --Samuel Johnson
“The best training is to read and write, no matter what.”  --Grace Paley
TEXT:  Stephen Minot and Thiel, Diane.  Three Genres: The Writing of Literary Prose, Poetry and Plays. 9th Edition.  New York: Prentice Hall, 2011

224.011: Introduction to Creative Writing

Online
Lisa Chavez

This online introductory course will introduce students to the craft of writing literary fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction.  We will begin with issues that all genres share, and then go on to look at some of the conventions of the individual genres.  Students should be prepared to learn to read like a writer, to try out a lot of different exercises, to learn the art of revision, and to write in all three genres.  Lively online discussion of the assigned readings are expected, and there will also be an introduction to peer review in small groups. A final portfolio will include work in all three genres that has been revised during the course.

240.001: Traditional Grammar

MWF 9-9:50
James Burbank

This course provides students a thorough understanding of descriptive sentence grammar. Course readings give context to the material. Grammar Nazis, prescriptive grammar, ideas about whether and how grammar should be taught are some of the issues we examine in the Traditional Grammar course.

240.002: Traditional Grammar: Grammar for Writers

TR 9:30-10:45
James Burbank

This course for Professional and Creative Writing students and other student writers focuses on rhetorical grammar—how syntax and grammar can be analyzed and used by writers to engage sentence-level practice in effective meaningful ways. Readings and passages by various authors will provide examples, focus, and framework for this intensive engagement with writing as vision and revision.

250.001: Analysis of Literature

MWF 9:00-9:50
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman

This course introduces the practice of literary analysis: the methods, terms, conventions, and conversations that guide scholars as they approach texts.  We will learn how to interpret texts from three literary genres—fiction, poetry, and folklore—using the critical vocabulary and theoretical methods from Critical Race Theory, Cultural Studies, New Criticism, Deconstruction, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, New Historicism, and Postcolonialism.  Overall, the class prepares students to engage in literary theory and textual analysis both orally and in writing.  You will come away from the class with sharper reading, research and writing skills, which you will deploy to generate and support an effective thesis using textual support and literary theory.

250.002: Analysis of Literature

MW 5:30-6:45
Jennifer Morgan Sims

The study of literature is a formal, academic field with rules and conventions of its own that require skills in close analysis, critical thinking and writing. In this class, we will focus on some of the theoretical approaches to the study of literature and you will use them to analyze works of literature, including, Formalism, Deconstruction, Feminism, Marxism, and Psychoanalytic theory. We will also study literary examples of three major genres:  fiction, drama, and poetry. In addition, to help the student learn the conventions of the academic field of literature, the student will be expected to learn general literary terminology.  

250.003: Analysis of Literature

TR 11:00-12:15
Katherine Alexander

This course offers an introduction to the study of literature.  It will focus on the study of selected literary pieces from different eras in the genres of poetry, drama, and fiction.  In the field of literature study, theory offers various lenses that aid in interpretation and understanding.  In this class, theoretical studies will include Formalism, Deconstruction, Marxism, Feminism, and Psychoanalysis.  Students will become proficient in the terminology and approach of each theoretical system as they read, discuss, and analyze assigned works.  Written work will include short responses and one five-page paper for each unit.  Several short quizzes will test the students’ familiarity with the terminology.  Upon finishing this class successfully, students will be prepared to enter upper division classes in the study of English literature.  

290.002: Introduction to Professional Writing

MWF 10-10:50
James Burbank

This course presents students with the various forms and contexts of Professional Writing. Students gain Professional Writing skills and explore and develop their career options.

290:011: Introduction to Professional Writing

Online
Valerie Thomas

This course introduces you to the field of professional writing. To help you learn about job opportunities within this field, you will explore the different types of careers available as a professional writer. You will also study a variety of professional writing genres so you understand their major traits and when it is appropriate to use each of them. Focusing on the need to create documents that convey professionalism, you will study the use of writing style and document design as well as how to manage the production of documents and deal with ethical situations that often arise in corporate, professional, private, and public workplaces. Projects in this course will allow you to do research, manage projects, work with others, and make presentations. This is not a course in a specific type of professional writing…freelance writing, public relations writing, public information writing, business writing, or technical writing; rather it will allow you to understand the fundamentals of these genres of professional writing and give you the chance to practice writing some of them.

292.001: World Literature: Ancient through 16th Century

MWF 9:00-9:50
Staff

This course will introduce you to key texts that span centuries and regions from ancient Mesopotamia to Elizabethan England. Not only will you analyze these stories, poems, plays, and essays in and of themselves, but you will also familiarize yourself with some of the political, social, and cultural contexts by which they were shaped. Furthermore, you’ll consider how the issues raised in these texts might continue to form some of your own perceptions of current events, social norms, political ideologies, and cultural constructs today.

292.002: World Literature: Ancient through 16th Century

TR 9:30-10:45 am
Feroza Jussawalla

This is one of the required courses in the World Literature Survey that fulfills core curriculum requirements. We will be using the Bedford Anthology of World Literatures, Vol. 1.  We will do some Greek and Western Ancient texts as well as Indian and other Asian texts, particularly the Ramayana and the Mahabharata and work our way up following the anthology closely even through British traditions such as some Chaucer and end with Shakespeare’s Tempest. My emphasis will be on postcoloniality and colonialism. We will even look at Postcolonial Chaucer.

294.001: Early English Literature

TR 5:00-6:15
Lisa Myers

This survey covers major British texts from the earliest surviving works of the Anglo-Saxons to the close of the 18th century with a focus on the social and cultural issues expressed in the literature. This course is divided into four major blocks. We will begin in the Early Middle Ages where we will focus on Anglo-Saxon literature and the communal nature of the society. Major texts include Beowulf and the Celtic myth The Wooing of Étaín. The second section of the course examines the culture of the High Middle Ages in England through a variety of genres including medieval romance, drama and the outlaw tales of Robin Hood. The social, religious and political upheavals of this period will serve as a backdrop for our study. Next we will move into the English Renaissance and the Early 17th Century where we will examine drama through Shakespeare’s King Lear and Marlowe’s The Tragical History of Dr. Faustus as well as a variety of poetry, concluding with Milton’s Paradise Lost. We will bring the course to a close with a sequence on the Restoration and 18th Century which will examine the use of literature for social change. Major texts for this sequence include Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, Swift’s A Modest Proposal and Pope’s The Rape of the Lock.

294.002: Early English Literature

MWF 10:00-10:50
Carolyn Woodward

In this survey of literature from the eighth through the eighteenth centuries, we’ll read traditional texts such as Beowulf and Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night as well as less-known pieces such as a 12th-century romance by Marie de France and 17th century poetry by Aphra Behn and John Wilmot (“Rochester”) surprisingly modern in its graphic details about sex.  We’ll make use of Norton’s Web resources to enrich our readings: for example, medieval writings sanctifying war against Moslems to enrich our study of Chaucer, and 18th-century arguments for and against the slave trade to enrich our study of Olaudah Equiano’s slave narrative.  Central to our study will be the construction in Anglo-Saxon epic poetry of basic features of the novel, the creation in the Renaissance of sonnet form, and the 18th-century development of musical comedy. Requirements: 2 papers, 2 exams, 2 group projects

296.004: Earlier American Literature

MW 5:30-6:45
Erin Murrah-Mandril

This course surveys American literature from the mid-sixteenth century (including British and Spanish colonial periods) to 1865. The course covers traditional American literary periods including the Colonial, Revolutionary, and Romantic. The course will be centered around a theme of: Shaping America. Along this line, we will consider the changing shape of the nation both geographically and conceptually. We will explore rhetoric of revolution, annexation, Manifest Destiny, and American exceptionalism. While we will give due attention to Northeastern literary production, and the emerging crisis of the Civil War, we will not ignore literature of the West and South places of protest, conquest, and counterpoint.

300-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

321.001: Intermediate Short Fiction

MW 4:00-5:15
Jack Trujillo

This is a craft-based class in short literary fiction.  The focus of our work is on the specific elements of craft that writers (that’s you) use to construct stories and an examination, using your own writing and the writing of others, of how those craft elements can be manipulated to achieve different narrative ends.  The first half of the semester is spent attacking the first short story you write in multiple ways: changing point of view, strengthening verbs, starting the story at an entirely new place, removing back story, for example.  The second half of the semester is spent workshopping a second story written for the class.  Both stories have specific limitations and rules (known lovingly around UNM as “Jack’s Creativity-Destroying Rules”).  Class requires much writing, much reading, two complete stories, a live reading review, a craft review of a collection of short fiction and written critiques of each of your fellow student’s stories.  Texts are Deepening Fiction by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren and a collection of short fiction by a contemporary writer.  

321.002: Intermediate Short Fiction

TR 2:00-3:15
Jack Trujillo

This is a craft-based class in short literary fiction.  The focus of our work is on the specific elements of craft that writers (that’s you) use to construct stories and an examination, using your own writing and the writing of others, of how those craft elements can be manipulated to achieve different narrative ends.  The first half of the semester is spent attacking the first short story you write in multiple ways: changing point of view, strengthening verbs, starting the story at an entirely new place, removing back story, for example.  The second half of the semester is spent workshopping a second story written for the class.  Both stories have specific limitations and rules (known lovingly around UNM as “Jack’s Creativity-Destroying Rules”).  Class requires much writing, much reading, two complete stories, a live reading review, a craft review of a collection of short fiction and written critiques of each of your fellow student’s stories.  Texts are Deepening Fiction by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren and a collection of short fiction by a contemporary writer.    

322.001: Intermediate Creative Writing: Poetry

TR 3:30-4:45
Lisa Chavez

This intermediate creative writing course focuses on poetry, and will introduce students to a wide variety of poetic forms and craft issues.  Students will try out various forms, from free verse to the sonnet, and will learn ways to write strong poems regardless of form or content.  Expect a lot of writing exercises and reading in contemporary poetry, with a peer critiquing at the end of the semester.  A final portfolio of revised poems will be expected at the end of the semester.

323.001: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

MW 4:00-5:15, 
Marisa P. Clark

This intermediate creative nonfiction course will introduce you to the many possibilities of creative nonfiction, including memoir and the personal essay, literary journalism, and travel and nature writing. In the first half of the semester, you will read a number of published pieces and do a variety of writing exercises intended to target various craft elements of literary nonfiction and generate material for full-length works. The second half of the semester will be devoted to writing and workshopping your own literary-quality essays. You will draft two essays in our class, one of which will be read and evaluated in workshop by the entire class and significantly revised at the end of the semester. Class discussions will concern elements of literary craft, naturally, but also the special kinds of responsibility that fall on writers of nonfiction. Readings will include essays by Judith Ortiz Cofer, Bernard Cooper, Edwidge Danticat, Joan Didion, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Philip Gourevitch, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tim O’Brien, Susan Orlean, David Sedaris, Brent Staples, and Luis Alberto Urrea. Prospective students: I realize this description sounds dry. I assure you the course is anything but. Please email me at clarkmp@unm.edu if you would like more information.

323.002: Intermediate Creative Nonfiction

TR 12:30 – 1:45
Marisa P. Clark

This intermediate creative nonfiction course will introduce you to the many possibilities of creative nonfiction, including memoir and the personal essay, literary journalism, and travel and nature writing. In the first half of the semester, you will read a number of published pieces and do a variety of writing exercises intended to target various craft elements of literary nonfiction and generate material for full-length works. The second half of the semester will be devoted to writing and workshopping your own literary-quality essays. You will draft two essays in our class, one of which will be read and evaluated in workshop by the entire class and significantly revised at the end of the semester. Class discussions will concern elements of literary craft, naturally, but also the special kinds of responsibility that fall on writers of nonfiction. Readings will include essays by Judith Ortiz Cofer, Bernard Cooper, Edwidge Danticat, Joan Didion, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Philip Gourevitch, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tim O’Brien, Susan Orlean, David Sedaris, Brent Staples, and Luis Alberto Urrea. Prospective students: I realize this description sounds dry. I assure you the course is anything but. Please email me at clarkmp@unm.edu if you would like more information.

349.001: From Beowulf to Arthur

MWF 11:00-11:50
Staff

This course serves as an introductory survey of early and later British medieval literature (which includes the works of several ‘Anglo-Norman’ authors writing on the Continent) between 700–1450 AD. The texts, originally in Old and Middle English, Welsh, Latin, and Anglo-Norman) will be read in Modern English translations, though some time will be spent on specific terms in the vernacular and the difficulties of accurate translation. The course aims to give students a basic knowledge of the variety and range of the genres of the period, including epic, romance, drama, lyrics, history, myths, saint’s lives, and inscriptions, as well as to impress upon the student the continuity and cultural complexity of medieval literature. The course will be augmented by art-historical presentations, manuscript studies and paleography exercises, and discussions about historiography and feminist critique.

In this class we will go beyond a simple reading of the texts to an analytical study of the themes and characteristics of the texts and how they endure and change through time and across cultures. We will discuss how politics, religion, economics, art, and other shifts in cultural perceptions affect the writer’s view of the world and how they portray it. This will be achieved through an immersion in the texts, frequent writing in and out of class, extra-curricular research, student presentations, and lively and informed class discussions. Texts: Beowulf (Seamus Heaney translation), The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: The Medieval Period

351.001: Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales

MWF 10-10:50
Staff

In this course, we will explore Chaucer’s most famous work, the Canterbury Tales. Chaucer’s collection of pilgrimage tales is one of the greatest, most imaginative, and varied pieces of all English literature. Consider its fascinating historical backdrop in late fourteenth century England: a generation prior, the plague had swept through Europe decimating the population; political unrest and religious turmoil; a child king had taken the throne; peasants rose up in rebellion; the Bible was translated into English; and heretics were burned at the stake—a world of both decay and renewal, of catastrophic violence and decline for some, but dazzling possibility for others. Through the voices of colorful storytellers, Chaucer’s last great poem tests the boundaries of social possibility in a “disenchanted” age, weighing the competing claims of allegory and realism, chivalry and commerce, men and women, traditional authority and individual experience. And it does so in our ancestor language of Middle English, simultaneously a colorful, earthy, and lofty idiom. We will, in essence, ride along with the pilgrims on our own journey to Canterbury and through the Middle Ages.

353.001: Later Shakespeare

TR 12:30-13:45
Marissa Greenberg

Shakespeare wrote some of his most powerful and enduring works in the latter part of his career: Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Tempest. These plays continue to fascinate because of their haunting representations of racial hatred, family conflict, ambition, violence, and redemption. In this course, we will read these and other plays as dramatic poems and theatrical scripts that engage the cultures in which they are read and performed. Through discussion of the political, social, and religious world in which Shakespeare lived, we will explore what these plays meant for their original audiences; and through recent stage productions and films, we will examine how their meanings have changed for modern-day audiences. Students should be prepared to write several informal essays and to engage actively in class discussion.

354.001: Milton

TR 9:30-10:45
Marissa Greenberg

Paradise Lost, John Milton’s epic retelling of the Biblical story of the fall, has been the inspiration for numerous creative writers, including novelists, short story writers, and other poets. In this course, we will read Paradise Lost alongside some the works it has inspired, in particular Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials. Through discussion of Milton’s earlier writings, we will trace the evolution of his characterizations of Satan, Adam, and Eve and his themes of free will, temptation, virtue, and poetic invention; and through comparative readings of Paradise Lost and its adaptations, we will explore how the meanings of these characters and themes have changed over time. Students should be prepared to write several informal essays and to engage actively in class discussion

365.001: Chicano/a Cultural Studies

MWF 11:00-11:50
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman

This course tracks the formation of contemporary Chicana/o identity politics and aesthetics through a historical and critical consideration of language, power, displacement, regionalism, and transnational movements.  The class will chart the emergence of Chicana/o cultural production and the paradigmatic shifts in identity, with attention to how the Spanish colonial, Mexican national, and the post-colonial US inform Chicana/o identity.  In order to achieve this critical and historical trajectory, we will read both primary and secondary texts that range from testimonios, folklore, ethnography, literature, short fiction, history, and criticism.  The class will also become familiar with the politics of Chicana/o film, art, and landscape architecture, as well as critical essays and the key terms of cultural studies.  We will hone our critical reading and thinking skills, and apply these skills to written assignments that engage in the art, aesthetics and politics of identity in Chicana/o cultural studies.

381.002 (AFST 381.002) African American Literature II

TR 9:30-10:45
Kadeshia Matthews

This course surveys African American Literature of the 20th century.  We will study the major authors and works of the Harlem Renaissance, the Chicago Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement and Black Feminism/Womanism, paying particular attention to recurring debates among writers about the proper subject matter, purpose of and audience for African American creative production, and the ways in which these debates have shaped the canon for African American literature.  Authors include Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, Alice Walker and Toni Morrison.  Grades will be based on participation in class discussion, quizzes, two short papers (%7e5 pp) and a midterm.

400-Level
100-Level | 200-Level | 300-Level | 400-Level

412.001: Capstone and Honors Seminar: Narratives of Courtship

TR 12:30-1:45
Aeron Hunt

First comes love ... really? Then comes marriage ... always? And as for baby carriages ... when they show up at all, why is it so often only on the last page? 
This course will examine the history and development of the courtship plot in the Anglo-American literary tradition from the eighteenth century to the present. Among the questions that will motivate our discussion are: How has courtship changed over time, and how have the stories told about it changed? What is the relationship of courtship to the stories a culture tells about itself? How (and why) have love and marriage come to bear the kinds of cultural burdens that they have? How have writers conceived of courtship in relation to the development of the gendered self? How have writers explored challenges to the traditional courtship plot, which has as its endpoint the union of man and woman in marriage?

Authors we read may include Samuel Richardson, Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Henry James, Virginia Woolf, and Jeffrey Eugenides. Secondary readings will include historical and sociological accounts of courtship, marriage, and the history of sexuality; literary critical and philosophical analyses of the courtship tradition; and feminist and queer responses to the courtship plot. Students will be responsible for an in-class presentation of secondary readings and/or an aspect of the history of courtship and sexuality, short reading response papers, a final research paper, and an in-class, conference style presentation of their research

414.011: Documentation

Online
Steve Benz

This course is about writing technical documents in professional, organizational contexts (business, government, nonprofit agencies). In the first part of the course, we will learn what technical writers do and what skills they need. We will review the technical writing process and the two predominant workflows authors follow to complete the steps in this process. We will also learn about the project management tools that every technical writer needs. The second half of the course addresses skills such as how to get information, organize information, and write content. As we practice these skills, we will also learn about other tasks in the content development process, such as creating visual content, production editing, and indexing. The course concludes with an overview of “structured authoring” and Web 2.0 trends in technical communication. Assignments include writing documents that can become part of a professional portfolio.

418.010: Proposal and Grant Writing

Online
Valerie Thomas

In this course, you will learn how to write persuasive grant proposals. Drawing off the principles of rhetorical analysis, you will learn how to develop a clear statement of need, offer achievable objectives, design logical step-by-step plans, create specific and accurate budgets, and present your organization powerfully. We will explore how to locate appropriate funding opportunities and how to evaluate requests for proposals. We will also discuss methods of writing persuasively that are both ethical and effective, and study how to use document design to create a professional proposal package.
Because proposal writing is not a solitary task, but rather a process of working with others to identify needs, locate opportunities, and develop a persuasive solution, it is helpful to understand how the process works in the real world. To accomplish this need for real world experience, the major project for the course will be to write a real proposal by working with a local organization in a service learning experience.

419.002: Visual Rhetoric

TR 5:00–6:15
Steve Benz

This course covers the basic principles of graphic design that writers should understand when creating documents for professional contexts. Our goal is to be able to do quality, basic layout and design work and to be able to talk sensibly to professional designers. Visual Rhetoric is defined as the art of using images to inform or persuade. A course in visual rhetoric, therefore, purposes to introduce students to the working vocabulary of this rhetoric, as well as the fundamentals of theory and practice associated with document design. In ENGL 419, we learn how to employ principles of effective document design and visual argumentation. We learn how visual elements contribute to and affect the meaning of documents. We study various aspects of document design, including layout, use of headings, typography, photos, illustrations, charts, tables, and graphs. The assignments in the course involve a series of projects that can ultimately become part of a professional portfolio.

419.011: Visual Rhetoric

Online
Valerie Thomas

This course provides theoretical and practical information on how to work with visual elements of textual communication that can be used in document and web design. Design in its broadest sense is an academic and professional discipline that requires years of study. For this course, you will consider yourself a writer who, because of the demands of computer technology, must understand principles of proper design and how to communicate visually in the documents you create. Thus your goal is to understand the principles of effective visual rhetoric so you can analyze existing document and web design, create your own effective layout and design work, and talk sensibly to professional designers and printers. To reach this goal, you will need to learn to use computer software to implement your layout and design ideas.

420.001: Blue Mesa Review

W 1400-1500, F 1500-1700
Justin St. Germain

This class introduces you to the production of UNM’s national literary magazine, Blue Mesa Review. We receive hundreds and sometimes thousands of submissions each year from authors hoping to see their stories, essays, or poems published in our journal. Your primary responsibility in this course is to assess these submissions—collectively called “slush”—for possible publication in BMR. In addition, you will keep an informal journal about your participation in slush, attend two discussion meetings, and write a few short papers. This class requires you to be self-motivating; in some respects, it is very much like an independent study. You must be able to keep up with the workload on your own—and often on your own time.

NOTE: The meeting times listed are open computer lab hours, NOT class meetings. Please contact instructor for more information on requirements and meeting times.

420.003: Writing the Southwest

TR 12:30-1:45
David Dunaway

This is a workshop course in writing about place--our place, the Great Southwest. Based in part on a national radio series and research project, Writing the Southwest takes you to the State Fair, and to worlds inside your memory for inspiration. This creative nonfiction class allows students to workshop their way to a more grounded, nuanced understanding of the techniques of selective description, characterization, and the publication process for nonfiction. The instructor has written for a wide variety of national publications, ranging from the New York Times to Country Music.

421.001: Advanced Fiction Workshop

MWF 11:00-11:50
Daniel Mueller

This workshop provides serious fiction writers the invaluable opportunity to have their work read closely and discussed deeply by a panel of equally serious peers who share, in their hearts and minds, a singular commitment to bringing each piece of fiction as close as possible to completion.  In this workshop, students will be expected to critique one another’s fiction orally and in writing, complete all reading assignments and writing exercises, and submit a final portfolio.  

421.002: Advanced Fiction Workshop

TR 11:00-12:45
Julie Shigekuni

The goal of this advanced fiction workshop is to distill experience, whether actual or perceived—infuse it with imagination and transform it into story. Expect to perform a number of writing experiments and to learn to identify and isolate elements of craft and use them to generate imaginative work. Strong content arises out of identifying and carefully nurturing each layer of a story; as such, we’ll pay special attention to how character development, setting, point of view, temporal distance, tone, pacing, and image function in your work. Class time will be split between writing and discussing your stories and reading and analyzing work by published authors.

423.001: Advanced Creative Writing -- Nonfiction

TR 3:30-4:45
Justin St. Germain

This is a creative writing workshop course in the genre of creative nonfiction, which includes memoir, the personal essay, reportage, the lyric essay, and hybrid forms. In addition to prerequisite courses, students should have an existing knowledge of the basics of narrative craft – scene, voice, point of view, and so on. Students will read and respond to published writing by prominent authors who push the boundaries of the genre, read and critique the writing of their peers, and have their own creative work read and discussed by the class. Course goals are to refine our understanding of craft, to practice providing constructive criticism and the process of revision, and to explore the possibilities of creative nonfiction.

423.001: Advanced Creative Nonfiction Workshop

Online
Diane Thiel

Creative nonfiction is a genre that stretches back to classical essayists such as Plato and Aristotle, but the term "creative nonfiction" is a relatively new one, the term itself suggesting that the writing is essentially true, though there are a multitude of ways to render a piece. We each find our own creative means of delivery. In this advanced online course, we will explore a number of sub-categories, including travel narrative, personal essay, and memoir, among others. Though the sub-genres of creative nonfiction are generally thought of as distinct, several categories often overlap in a single piece. This course will have a strong focus on memoir, travel writing and personal essay, but will also delve into other forms of nonfiction as well. We will read a number of shorter pieces of creative nonfiction by writers such as Judith Ortiz Cofer, Sherman Alexie, and Diane Ackerman, as well as essays about the writing of creative nonfiction, by writers such as Lee Gutkind, and Margaret Atwood. The course will include extensive and intensive weekly workshop of students' writing and provide a variety of writing exercises to address specific elements of writing creative nonfiction. Students will be responsible for one critical paper responding to the assigned reading, several informal reading responses, weekly peer reviews, as well as a portfolio of about 30 pages of creative work.

440.001: Introduction to Writing & Cultural Studies

TR 2:00-3:15
Michelle Hall Kells

“Ideology is rhetoric that persuades its audience that it’s not rhetoric” –Paul de Man

The scope of ENGL 440/540 Introduction to Writing & Cultural Studies will include examination of regional, national, and international themes through the lens of cultural rhetorical studies.  Cultural Studies (consciously and unconsciously) seeks the rhetorical means (genres, strategies, and media) for resistance. The intellectual operating space of this course rests at the intersection between rhetorical studies and cultural studies to promote study of how writing (text) and the performance of identity (and the struggle for power) happens through legitimate social institutions as well as outside sanctioned social institutions. Combining literacy studies, rhetorical analysis with critical theory this course will promote the study of public discourses related to self-representation (and the transition from political and social marginalization to civic inclusion). 

This course will serve the needs and interests of students pursuing degrees within and outside the department of English whose professional, civic, and academic lives demand strong, versatile writing skills that extend across diverse discourse communities.  It will allow students to engage in critical and rhetorical analysis as well as close readings of various kinds of texts, and to produce scholarship in the discipline of English Studies not limited to traditional genres and canonical categories. The emphasis is a way not just to link to diversified writing contexts, but to respond to them through the production of multiple writing genres. To examine the relationship of rhetorical situation to genre, we will also conduct various field work exercises to observe and participate in public rhetorics (e.g. political campaigns, spoken word poetry, film, art, community events, etc.)

This course aligns and promotes each of the three strands within English Studies: Rhetoric & Writing, Literature, and Creative Writing.  Cross-disciplinary concentrations will be articulated by the needs, interests, and goals of students themselves. Students will examine the varied ways that writers exercise agency by constructing situations through genres as well as constructing genres through situations.  As Charles Paine argues: “Our writing, then, rather than acting as a one-time inoculation against an ever-changing dominant ideology, might bring our students toward more healthy attitudes about argument and public participation” (The Resistant Writer: Rhetoric as Immunity 201). Previous course work in Cultural Studies or Rhetoric not required.
 
Course Assignments:

  • Class Discuss Leader (2)
  • Reader Response Log (5 entries)
  • Community Literacy/Public Rhetoric Observation Report (1 Midterm Report)
  • Team Project & Presentation  (1)
  • Rhetorical Analysis Portfolio (2 Analysis Essays from one of the following contexts: Film, Poetry/Spoken Word, Theatre, Art, Music, Public Rhetoric/Community Literacy 

Required Texts: 
Berger, Arthur Asa. Cultural Criticism: A Primer of Key Concepts. Sage Publications, 1995.
Goldblatt, Eli. Because We Live Here: Sponsoring Literacy Beyond the College Curriculum. Hampton Press, 2007. 
Nystrand, Martin and John Duffy, eds. Towards a Rhetoric of Everyday Life: New Directions in Research on Writing, Text, and Discourse. University of Wisconsin, 2003.
Thomas Rosteck, ed. At the Intersections: Cultural and Rhetorical Studies. London: Guilford Press, 1999.  (Graduate Students Only)

Recommended Text:
Raymond Williams. Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society. Rev. ed.  Oxford University Press, 1985. 

Required Films: (Available at Zimmerman Reserve Desk): Each of the following films is situated within various transcultural/transnational contexts. These very different narratives explore the social dynamics of shifting subject positions and the possibilities of transformative relationships across class, race, gender, and national boundaries.

10 Items or Less.
The Band’s Visit.
Il Postino.
Antonia’s Line.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Course readings, assignments, exercises, and class discussions are designed to promote the following learning outcomes:
  • Negotiate diverse discourse communities through oral and written communication;
  • Engage the analytical resources of rhetorical studies;
  • Apply concepts of cultural studies;
  • Analyze the use of genre in relation to the rhetorical, contextual, and ethical dimensions of communicative situations; 
  • Examine and apply the principles of cultural criticism;
  • Guide and participate in class discussions of course readings; 
  • Evaluate the interpretative resources of cultural studies; 
  • Use the writing process as recursive stages (from invention to editing) for writing tasks;
  • Conduct observations and generate field notes of diverse cultural and rhetorical events; 
  • Connect  learning to the rhetoric of everyday life; 
  • Cultivate alliances with peers and work collaboratively toward common goals;

441.001: English Grammars

R 4:00-6:30
Jill V. Jeffery

(Also offered as LING 441; Prerequisite: 240). This course presents a socioculturally informed framework for understanding grammar that emphasizes interplay between micro-level and macro-level discourse structures. Students in the course will examine relationships between English language variation, culture, and identity by analyzing diverse oral, written, and multi-modal texts. The course is designed to help students acquire a foundational, descriptive knowledge of English grammars that will support more effective teaching, learning, and interpretation of English. The culminating course assignment is a multi-modal research project regarding English language variation across time, space, and/or social strata. Graduate students will also present brief, interrelated discourse analyses and reflect on pedagogical implications.

445.001: History of the English Language

MW 2:00-3:15
Jonathan Davis-Secord

The English language can be traced back many centuries to a form nearly unrecognizable to most modern speakers.  Nonetheless, present day English still contains many significant features of its previous incarnations.  This course will examine the history of English from its Indo-European roots through its medieval developments to its modern, international forms.  In the process, students will learn methods of linguistic analysis and description along with the historical contexts of the developments.  No prior knowledge of Old or Middle English is necessary.

447.001: Introduction to Old English

MW 12:30-1:45
Jonathan Davis-Secord

In this class, we will return to the earliest recorded form of English and read some of the oldest literature ever written in the language.  We will read of a queen-turned-abbess, a divinely inspired cowherd, an exploration of the North, and the dangers of celebrity, all in the original Old English.  We will supplement these translations by exploring current scholarly approaches to Old English literature.  The first half of the semester will entail studying grammar in preparation for reading original texts.  For daily work during the second half, students will prepare translations and occasionally read scholarly articles.  No prior knowledge of Old English is required.  

455.001: Gothic Imaginings in the Later Eighteenth Century

MW 2:00-3:15pm
Carolyn Woodward

During the last decades of the eighteenth century, English society unraveled. The philosophies of Shaftesbury, Adam Smith, and David Hume, which for most of the century had provided theories of action and motivation that justified the self-interested behavior of the privileged classes, lost their power. Contradictions began to surface, between an English ideology that inscribed individual/societal mutual well-being and England’s actual economic and political conditions. Incidents like the Gordon riots in 1780 (as well as the terrifying reality of the French Revolution) revealed a rupture in what had been thought of as the time and place of gentlemen and ladies who smoothly practiced polite behavior.  The Gothic novel, which grew from this social climate, was a new and fearful genre for a new and fearful time. The specter of social revolution is manifest in the supernatural specters of the Gothic: a crumbling way of life emerges as a crumbling and haunted Gothic manor; the loss of English social identity becomes the Gothic protagonist’s search for identity. The incredible popularity of the genre in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, as well as for us today, points to a resilience that cannot be overlooked. What is it about these repetitive and fantastical works that is so seductive to readers? Texts: Broadview anthology coursepak; Three Oriental Tales ed Richardson, Matthew Lewis’s The Monk, Ann Radcliffe’s The Italian, Charlotte Dacre’s Zoyfloya; plus a film viewing of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey. Requirements: questions for class discussion, 2 exams, one research paper.

461.001: American Romanticism

TR 2:00-3:15pm
Jesse Aleman

This course understands the American renaissance as a historical moment during the mid-nineteenth-century that saw radical changes in everything from literature and print culture to domesticity and democracy. It was a time teeming with excitement and energy for the United States, as it developed into a national power and self-consciously struggled to generate its own national literature. Normally, we associate this era with canonical authors, such as Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman, but the writings of marginal authors, such as Douglass, Fuller, Poe, and Lippard, demonstrate the diversity of American literature that boomed between the 1830s to the 1850s. This course will survey and analyze the key texts and authors of mid-nineteenth-century American literature. It will focus on major movements such as transcendentalism and romanticism; major literary forms such as essays and novels; and major socio-historical factors such as Indian removal, slavery, domesticity, and the rise of market capitalism and industry, but we’ll also read and discuss lesser-known writings and authors to experience the variety of texts that the American renaissance fostered and fueled in the years preceding the U.S. Civil War. 

463.002: Modern American Literature

R 5:00 – 6:15
Kathleen Washburn

This course takes up interconnected visions of American pasts and futures in a range of novels from the early twentieth century. We will address how various writers “make it new” by experimenting with the subjects and forms of American literature. A central focus for our course involves the relationship between looking forward and looking backward to imagine the boundaries of modern America in a new century. For if modernity signals a break with tradition, then why do so many novels from the early twentieth century dwell on the past? And with a national mythology rooted in narratives of self-invention, which pasts do modern American novels memorialize or obscure? Which futures do they imagine? From fictional utopias and Old New York to lost mesas and the Lost Generation, we will investigate the remembered places and futuristic spaces of American fiction in a changing modern landscape. To do so, we also will address various critical models of historical memory and cultural nostalgia.

Texts for the course may include: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herland; Edith Wharton, The Age of Innocence; Willa Cather, The Professor’s House; F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; Nella Larsen, Quicksand; John Joseph Mathews, Sundown. Course requirements include an annotated bibliography, short essay (5 pages), and longer essay (8-10 pages).

468.002: Ezra Pound and the Generations

T 4:00-6:30
M. R. Hofer

Ezra Pound, that “serious artist,” is a uniquely contested yet canonical American writer whose body of work towers over the development of modernist and contemporary literature alike. He has been—as everyone knows—celebrated primarily for his art and disparaged primarily for his politics. In this seminar, without neglecting the latter, we will address the former, initially on its own terms and then in the context of later attempts to use Poundian poetic theory and practice to re-imagine the modes and possibilities of aesthetic representation throughout the twentieth century. We will employ formal as well as historical and thematic analysis to ground and better understand the evolution of theories of innovative poetics during the 1930s, 1950's, and beyond. Our objective is to comprehend not only significance but also the persistence of the work of a major poet who insisted on operating in the public sphere, whether it be viewed as a record of triumphant achievement, or as a cautionary tale for ambitious younger writers, or (perhaps) as both. We will be striving to come to terms with Pound’s many engagements with culture, economics, and politics in order to discover how the various tensions between those commitments may have informed his own ideas . . . and continue to affect those of succeeding generations of American poets.

473.001: Postmodernism

TR 9:30—10:45
Scarlett Higgins

This course will serve as an introduction to the literature (and films) of postmodernity. We will examine postmodernism from three different perspectives: as a chronological era, as a set of formal innovations in literary and aesthetic technique, and as a state in which the traditional social supports such as the family have eroded or disappeared, and so individuals are left to find their own way in society. This unmooring of the traditional family creates new opportunities for the exploration of identity. Texts may include the following:

  • Kathy Acker, Great Expectations
  • Don DeLillo, White Noise
  • Thomas Pynchon, The Crying of Lot 49
  • Art Spiegelman, Maus
  • Colson Whitehead, The Intuitionists
  • Jeanette Winterson, Written on the Body
  • Ridley Scott, Blade Runner
  • Wachowski Brothers, The Matrix
  • David Fincher, Fight Club
  • Christopher Nolan, Memento

Evaluation will be based on class participation, weekly quizzes and response papers, and a research project, plus a final.

499.001: Internship Seminar

MWF 2:00-2:50
James Burbank

Students who take this seminar develop, explore, and prepare for their professional options following University. Students research and plan career campaigns through resume, portfolio development. The course is linked to student internships done either concurrent or prior to the course.

Department of English Language and Literature
Humanities Building, Second Floor
MSC03 2170
1 University of New Mexico
Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001

Phone: (505) 277-6347
Fax: (505) 277-0021

english@unm.edu